Eating More Fish Reduces Total Mortality, a Large Study Says

A new research, published in the Journal of Internal Medicine, finds that consuming more fish and long-chain omega-3s reduces total mortality. However, scientists insist that not all cooking methods are good for that matter.fish reduces total mortality

For the study, a team of researchers performed an analysis of data from NIH-AARP Diet and Health study, which included information on the dietary habits and health of 240,729 men and 180,580 women followed for 16 years.

The authors conclude: “Consumption of fish and [omega-3s] was robustly associated with lower mortality from major causes. Our findings support current guidelines for fish consumption while advice on non-frying preparation methods is needed.”

Eating Vegetables, Fruit, and Fish May Keep Your Brain Sharp

A new study finds that brain volumes of people who regularly eat vegetables, fruit, and fish are on average 2ml greater than brain volumes of those who often drink sugary beverages. A brain volume reduction of 3.6ml equals to one year of aging.vegetables keep your brain sharp

For the study, the researchers from Erasmus University, Rotterdam, analyzed diets of 4,213 adults with an average age of 66 who didn’t have dementia. The participants also had to take scans to determine their brain volumes.

Dr Meike Vernooij, the author of the study, says: “People with greater brain volume have been shown in other studies to have better cognitive abilities, so initiatives that help improve diet quality may be a good strategy to maintain thinking skills in older adults.”

Eating Cod, Herring, and Red Snapper May Prevent Parkinson’s Disease

A new study, led by Professor Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede from the Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, suggests that eating cod, herring, and red snapper may help in preventing Parkinson’s disease.eating cod prevents parkinson's disease

The researchers also highlight that fish is normally a lot more nutritious at the end of summer because of increased metabolic activity.

One of the study researchers Nathalie Scheers says: “Levels of parvalbumin [a protein that prevents the formation of protein structures associated with the tremor disorder] are much higher in fish after they had a lot of sun, so it could be worthwhile increasing consumption during autumn.”

Other conditions linked to protein formation in the brain such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases may also benefit from higher fish consumption. The researchers plan to investigate the potential of parvalbumin in the future studies.

Eating Fish Twice a Week Can Help Ease Symptoms of Arthritis

A recent research from the UK finds that eating fish just twice a week can help relieve the symptoms of arthritis.eating fish helps ease symptoms of arthritis

For the study, the team of researchers followed 176 patients with rheumatism living in Baltimore and estimated how often they ate fish over the past year, as well as the size of the portion. The fish, included in the study, were tuna, salmon, sardines, raw fish such as sashimi or sushi, and grilled, steamed baked trout, sole, halibut, grouper, and poke.

Dr. Sara Tedeschi, the lead author of the study in Arthritis Care and Research, says: “If our finding holds up in other studies it suggests that fish consumption may lower inflammation related to rheumatoid arthritis disease activity.”

People Eating Mercury-Heavy Fish Are at Higher Risk of Developing ALS

A preliminary research suggests that eating mercury-laden fish can be connected to the risk of developing ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis).mercury in fish linked to developing ALS

For the study, the researchers surveyed around 500 people, 294 people with ALS and 224 without it. Participants were asked about their eating habits concerning fish and seafood, and whether they caught it themselves or bought it. Then the researchers estimated how much mercury the participants consumed each year. They also tested participants’ toenail clippings for mercury content.

After the analysis, the scientists found that 61% of those with ALS were in the top quarter of mercury consumption, compared to 44% of those without ALS. However, the study only establishes a link between the two and does not find a cause-and-effect relationship.