People with Obesity May Carry the Influenza Virus Longer

A new study, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, finds that people with obesity may carry the influenza A virus for longer periods of time compared to people with the normal weight. The study suggests that obesity affects the severity of flu symptoms, as well as the virus spreads.obese people carry influenza virus longer

For the study, a team of researchers collected and analyzed data on around 1783 people from Managua in Nicaragua during the three seasons of flu from 2015 till 2017. The results of the analysis showed that people with obesity who had flu shed the virus for 42% longer than people without the obesity.

Stacey Schultz-Cherry of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, US, comments on the public health implications of the study: “It is therefore even more important to develop effective strategies to prevent and control influenza, especially in the overweight and obese population,” she writes, “which could be challenging because of the poor vaccine responses in this population.”

Flu Vaccine in Form of Nasal Drops Can Be More Effective than Flu Shots

A recent research, published in the journal Science has discovered a potential way to break down the ability of flu viruses to adapt and mutate. Flu vaccine in form of nasal drops may successfully fight influenza viruses in the future.flu vaccine in form of nasal drops

A team of researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, found the solution to a vaccine issue with a completely new approach. This approach preserves robust immune responses and works by identifying and eliminating immune evasion function of the viruses.

Ren Sun says: “With this approach, the safety and efficacy requirement of vaccines can potentially be achieved simultaneously. In traditional vaccine development, one is usually sacrificed for the other.”

Being in a Good Mood May Boost Positive Effect of Flu Vaccination

A new study, executed by a team of health scientists from the University of Nottingham, finds that being in a good mood on a day of flu vaccination may increase its positive effect.flu vaccination

For the research, the team measured negative mood, positive mood, physical activity, diet, and sleep three times a week over a 6 week period in a group of 138 older people getting their vaccination. The analysis showed that of all factors only good mood over the 6 weeks observational period predicted how well the shot worked. A good mood associated with higher levels of antibody.

Professor Kavita Vedhara, from the University’s Division of Primary Care, explains: “Vaccinations are an incredibly effective way of reducing the likelihood of catching infectious diseases. But their Achilles heel is that their ability to protect against disease is affected by how well an individual’s immune system works. So people with less effective immune systems, such as the elderly, may find vaccines don’t work as well for them as they do in the young. We have known for many years that a number of psychological and behavioral factors such as stress, physical activity and diet influence how well the immune system works and these factors have also been shown to influence how well vaccines protect against disease.”

Vitamin D Supplement Can Help Protect You from Cold and Flu

A new study, conducted by the Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), states that the consumption of Vitamin D supplement can help in protecting people against respiratory infectious diseases, such as flu and cold.vitamin D supplement

For the study, the team of researchers analyzed data from 11,000 people who took part in 25 clinical trials in 14 countries, including the UK, Japan, U.S., India, and Italy. The results show that 1 person of 33 people taking the supplement was free from infection.

Researchers note: “The bottom line is that the protective effects of vitamin D supplementation are strongest in those who have the lowest vitamin D levels, and when supplementation is given daily or weekly rather than in more widely spaced doses.”

Protect Your Pet from the Flu: 4 Easy to Follow Tips

If you have a pet, you know how it’s hard to watch when your lovely one suffers from some disease. Believe it or not, but pets can easily get a flu, just like you and it is as common as between people.

One recent study in Ohio found 30 percent of cats had been infected with the flu virus. The symptoms are the same as the ones humans face: breathing difficulty, runny nose and fatigue.

Very often we can be the one who bring flu to our pets. Here are 4 short tips to protect your pets from getting sick.

  1. Wash you hands
    Remember that you are the one who can transmit a flu to your pet, so it depends on you how healthy your cat or dog is.
  2. Cover your mouth when coughing
    Do not think that our viruses cannot be cathed by your pet. It’s a mistake because they easily can get a flu from their owners.
  3. Update your pet’s vaccines
    It is important to prevent diseases in time and your vet will be able to help you.
  4. Get a flu shot

Don’t forget that pets can get viruses from other pets, so be sure that your pet’s friends are healthy and have all needed vaccines.