A Large Study Found 72 New Gene Variants of Breast Cancer

The world’s largest collective study on the genetics of breast cancer found 72 new gene variants that can be responsible for increasing the risk of developing the disease.new gene variations

For the study, more than 300 research groups were involved in the analysis of genetic data received from over 275,000 women from all around the globe. The scientists were able to identify 65 variations of genes that contributed to the development of cancer. Other 7 genes were identified specifically in association with breast cancers that lacked estrogen receptors.

Researcher Georgia Chenevix-Trench from the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Australia says: “We know that breast cancer is caused by complex interactions between these genetic variants and our environment, but these newly discovered markers bring the number of known variants associated with breast cancer to around 180.”

A Study Identified New Genetic Locations for Type 2 Diabetes

A team of scientists from University College London and Imperial College London, UK, discovered genetic locations that may help to understand why some people have higher chances to develop type 2 diabetes.new genetic locations

For their study, the researchers used a UCL-developed method of genetic mapping. Using this method, they examined samples of European and African people, what counts for 5,800 cases of the condition and 9,700 cases of healthy controls. The researchers found that the three locations coincided with chromosomal regions regulating gene expression, contain epigenetic markers. Present genetic mutations are suggested to cause type 2 diabetes.

Dr. Toby Andrew, a lead researcher, says: “Before we can conduct the functional studies required in order to better understand the molecular basis of this disease, we first need to identify as many plausible candidate loci as possible. Genetic maps are key to this task, by integrating the cross-platform genomic data in a biologically meaningful way.”

Your Genes Determine How Music or Noise Influence Your Mood

A new imaging genetics study, led by the Professor Elvira Brattico from Aarhus University and conducted in two Italian hospitals in cooperation with the University of Helsinki (Finland), has found the first evidence that the influence of music and noise on affective behaviour and brain psychology are associated with genetically determined dopamine functionality.music influences mood

The study discovered that a functional variation in dopamine D2 receptor gene modulates the influence of music as opposed to noise on mood states and emotion-related prefrontal and striatal brain activity. Results of the study showed mood improvement after listening to music in subjects with GG genotype and mood deterioration after listening to noise in subjects with GT genotype.

The director of the study Professor Elvira Brattico says: “This study represents the first use of the imaging genetics approach in the field of music and sounds in general. We are really excited about our results because they suggest that even a non-pharmacological intervention such as music, might regulate mood and emotional responses at both the behavioural and neuronal level.”

More information here.

Women Are Less Likely to Develop Cancer Due to Protective Genes

A new research, published in Nature Genetics, finds that women are less likely to develop cancer than men because they may be programmed to resist the disease. Scientists say they carry an extra copy of certain protective genes in their cells.develop cancer

For their study, the researchers scanned the genomes of more than 4,000 tumour samples of 21 different types of cancer. Then they examined whether any of the irregularities were more common in male cells or female cells. The result is that of 800 genes found solely on the X chromosome, 6 were more frequently mutated and incapacitated in males than in women.

Dr Andrew Lane from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA, says: “Across virtually every type of cancer, occurrence rates are higher in males than in females.”

More information about the study is here.

Scientists Identified a Gene Changing the Way Brain Cells Communicate

A team of researchers from McMaster University’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute in collaboration with Sick Children’s Hospital identified genetic alterations in the gene DIXDC1 in people with autism spectrum disorder. This gene is responsible for changing the way brain cells communicate and grow.brain cells communicate

The study suggests new insights into ASD that will help develop new medications for individuals with the condition.

Karun Singh, a scientist with the Stem Cell and Cancer Research, who was a lead author of the study, says: “Because we pinpointed why DIXDC1 is turned off in some forms of autism, my lab at the SCCRI, which specializes in drug discovery, now has the opportunity to begin the searching for drugs that will turn DIXDC1 back on and correct synaptic connections. This is exciting because such a drug would have the potential to be a new treatment for autism.”

More information here.