Gluten-Free Diet Won’t Protect You from Heart Disease

A new study finds that eating a gluten-free diet without a need to do so will not boost your heart health. Instead, it may even harm it.gluten-free diet not good

For this study, a team of scientists analyzed data from nearly 65,000 women and more than 45,000 men without a history of heart disease at the beginning of the study. The participants completed a detailed food questionnaire in 1986 and updated it every 4 years until 2010. The researchers looked at the amount of gluten, consumed by a different group of people.

Having analyzed the received results of cases with heart disease, the researchers concluded that the results of both highest-intake gluten group and lowest-intake gluten group were pretty similar.

Scientists agree that there is no need for people who do not have gluten sensitivity or celiac disease to refuse from gluten.

Low-Gluten Diet Linked to the Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A new research, presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle 2017 Scientific Sessions, suggests that eating a low-gluten diet may increase the chances of getting type 2 diabetes.low-gluten diet

For the study, the team evaluated the gluten consumption of nearly 200,000 individuals in three long-term studies. Having analyzed the collected data, the scientists concluded that participants who had the highest gluten intake, up to 12g a day, had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes over the 30-year period. This is connected to the fact that cereals contain fiber, which is known to protect against type 2 diabetes.

Geng Zong, one of the study’s authors and a researcher in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public School in Boston, says: “People without celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes.”

Gluten-Free Diet Connected to the Higher Amounts of Toxic Metals

Although not that many people have celiac disease, a gluten-free diet is very popular around the globe. However, new research suggests that gluten-free foods can be harmful to health as they may contain higher amounts of toxic metals.gluten-free diet

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois, Chicago, report that rice flour, a substitute for wheat, tends to accumulate toxic metals able to increase the risk of cancer, heart disease, and neurologic illnesses. Other studies also linked rice to the toxic metals, such as arsenic and mercury.

For their studies, the researchers asked around 7,480 people about their diet habits and discovered that among the 73 people eating gluten-free foods, levels of arsenic in their urine and mercury in blood were more concentrated than in the respondents preferring other diets.

Celiac Disease Can Be Linked to Time and Place of Birth

According to a Swedish study, people who were born in winter or in places where days are shorter and have less sunlight may have a lower risk of celiac disease compared to people born in warmer regions or seasons.celiac disease

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that damages and interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food. People with this condition cannot tolerate gluten, a protein in wheat, rye, and barley.

Scientists still don’t know the exact causes of the disease, but some previous studies pointed out the potential for the season of birth of a baby to be among many environmental factors able to affect the risk according to the lead author of the research Fredinah Namatovu, a public health researcher at the Umea University in Sweden.

Namatovu says: “Seasons of birth and area of birth appears to play a role. Season and region of birth could be a proxy for other factors such as vitamin D and viral infections.”

More detail here.

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