People Working in Open-plan Offices Are More Active and Less Stressed

Recent research from the University of Arizona, USA, suggests that workers who work in open-plan offices are more active and less stressed compared to the workers who have their desks in cubicles or separate offices.open-plan offices are better for health

The researchers of the study claim that they were the first who measured activity and stress in office workers instead of asking them with the help of questionnaires. Having analyzed the activity, the scientists concluded that workers in open-plan offices were 32% more physically active than those in private offices and 20% more active than those in cubicles.

Esther Sternberg, a study author and professor at University of Arizona College of Medicine, says: “We all know we should be increasing our activity but no matter how we try to encourage people to engage in healthy behavior, it doesn’t work for long. So changing office design to encourage a healthy behavior is a passive way of getting people to be more active.”

5 Risk Factors That Are Almost as Harmful as Cigarette Smoking

Cigarette smoking considered to be the largest risk factor for morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Nevertheless, according to the national studies, it tends to decrease in the recent decades.  But there are also other risk factors coming into a view. Here are 5 things in your everyday life you should pay attention to avoid health risks:5 risk factors as harmful as cigarette smoking

  1. Loneliness reduces lifespan by the equivalent of smoking 15 cigarettes daily, according to a research from Brigham Young University.
  2. Sitting increases people’s risks for colon, endometrial, and lung cancer.
  3. Poor sleep is considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.
  4. Indoor tanning increases the risk of skin cancer.
  5. A poor diet high in sugar, processed foods, and saturated fats expose people to potentially fatal diseases at similar rates as smoking.

Walking Faster May Help You Live Longer, a Big Study Says

According to a new study, executed by an international team of scientists from the University of Sydney in Australia, the University of Limerick in Ireland, and the Universities of the Cambridge, Edinburgh, and Ulster, UK, those people who walk fast may have higher chances to live longer.walking fast may help you live longer

For the research, the scientists analyzed 11 population-based surveys conducted in the United Kingdom between 1994 and 2008 from 50,552 walkers. The analysis showed that an average walking pace was associated with a 20% lower risk of death from all causes while walking fast, about 5–7 km per hour, was linked to 24% lower risk.

Lead researchers Prof. Emmanuel Stamatakis says: “Especially in situations when walking more isn’t possible due to time pressures or a less walking-friendly environment, walking faster may be a good option to get the heart rate up — one that most people can easily incorporate into their lives.”

Why Childhood Friendships Are Good for Your Health

According to a study, recently published in the journal Psychological Science, the more time you spent with your best friends in childhood, the likelier you have a healthy weight and blood pressure in adulthood.childhood friendships

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from a large study of 267 adults whose social lives were monitored between the ages of 6 and 16. The results of the analysis showed that adults who used to spend a lot of time with their buddies in childhood had lower blood pressure levels and body mass index (BMI) at the age 32.

Jenny M. Cundiff, one of the study authors from Texas Tech University in Lubbock, USA, says: “These findings suggest that our early social lives may have a small protective influence on our physical health in adulthood, and it’s not just our caregivers or financial circumstances, but also friends who may be health protective.”

Going to a Concert Is Better for Your Health than Yoga

Researchers from the University of London discovered that people who listened to live music for 20 minutes had 21% boost in their mood while those who took yoga class had only 10%.concert

For their study, scientists performed psychometric tests on 60 people who either went to a Paloma Faith music concert, a yoga class or walked their dog. After completing the 40 question quiz, the participants were formed into three groups to monitor their heart rates.

Patrick Fagan, an expert in behavioral science and associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s University in London, says: “Our research showcases the profound impact gigs have on feelings of health, happiness, and wellbeing – with fortnightly or regular attendance being the key.”