7 Really Simple Things to Do to Lower the Risk of High Blood Pressure

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, kills quietly as there are not any obvious signs. It can be quite difficult to see outer signs of high pressure building up in a person’s blood vessels. And extra stress on arteries normally leads to a heart attack, a stroke, or heart failure.fruits and veggies good for high blood pressure

Here is what you can do to reduce the risk of high blood pressure:

  1. Spend more time with family and friends.
  2. Do aerobic exercises.
  3. Drink less alcohol.
  4. Reduce the size of your waistline.
  5. Cut intake of salt and add more fresh fruits and vegetables.
  6. Reduce the level of stress and get enough sleep.
  7. Quit smoking.

Risk of Heart Attack Connected to Certain Blood Types

A new study suggests that the certain blood types might be connected to increased or decreased risk of having heart attack in response to high levels of air pollution.blood types

A team of researchers analyzed data from Intermountain Healthcare patients seen between 1993 and 2007 and concluded that a variant ABO gene, which can be found in blood types A, B, ad AB, has been associated with elevated risk of heart attack during periods of significant air pollution. People with blood type O demonstrated lower risk.

Clinical epidemiologist Benjamin Horne from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, US, explains: “In the information, we provide to our patients about pollution, we try to stress that they can do something about it to reduce their risks. Stay indoors out of pollution. Exercise indoors. And make sure they’re compliant with taking their heart medication to reduce their risk.”

Colder Weather Could Increase the Risk of Heart Failure in Senior People

According to the study from Université Laval and Université de Sherbrooke in Quebec, Canada, dropping temperatures and changes in atmospheric pressure can lead to an increase in the risk of heart failure for elderly people.cold weather increases the risk of heart failure

The scientists believe that senior people with a higher chance of heart failure should avoid fog and low cloud in the winter months.

The team of researchers looked at 112,793 people, aged 65 years and above, with the diagnosis of heart failure in Quebec between 2001 and 2011.

Across an average of 635 days, the participants of the study were monitored, and readings for temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure and air pollutants were also measured. Having analyzed the received data, the scientists revealed a higher risk of hospitalization or death in the winter (October to April) compared to the summer (May to September).

High Calcium Levels Linked to the Higher Risk of Heart Attack

A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm suggests that high calcium levels in the bloodstream increase the risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart attack.high calcium levels

For the study, the researchers analyzed publicly available data collected from 184,305 persons, 60,801 of whom had been diagnosed with CAD. Among these 60,801 individuals, 70% also experienced a heart attack. The scientists discovered that a higher risk of CAD and heart attack was linked to a genetic predisposition to a higher calcium concentration in blood.

Dr. Susanna C. Larsson, the author of the study, says: “Whether the risk of CAD associated with lifelong genetic exposure to increased serum calcium levels can be translated to a risk associated with short-term to medium-term calcium supplementation is unknown.”

Working More than 55 Hours a Week Increases the Risk of Heart Issues

According to the findings of a new study, published in the European Heart Journal, people who work more than 55 hours are at greater risk of developing serious heart issues. The researchers say that long working hours may increase the risk by 40%.heart issues

A study tracked more than 85,500 British and Scandinavian people and discovered that those who worked long hours were far more likely to develop atrial fibrillation over the next decade.

Study leader Professor Mika Kivimaki, of University College of London, says: “Those who worked long hours had a 1.4 times higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation, even after we had adjusted for factors that could affect the risk, such as age, sex, socioeconomic status, obesity, leisure time physical activity, smoking and risky alcohol use. Nine out of 10 of the atrial fibrillation cases occurred in people who were free of pre-existing or concurrent cardiovascular disease.”

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