Physical Activity Makes Heart Attack Patients Feel Better

New large research, carried out by a team of scientists from the University of Leeds, UK, finds that heart attack patients who take part in a lifestyle improvement program feel better, especially when they perform additional physical activity.physical activity for heart attack patients

In this study, called EMMACE-3, 4,570 patients admitted to 48 hospitals in England with a suspected heart attack from 2011 to 2013 were included. The participants filled in questionnaires during their stay at the hospital and 1,6, and 12 months after discharge. The questionnaire included questions concerning cardiac rehabilitation visits, the possibility to notice the quality of life, and physical activity.

Study author Dr. Ben Hurdus says: “Cardiac rehabilitation involves not only exercise but also advice on lifestyle and medications which likely all contribute to making people feel better. There are also the added social benefits such as being around other people in a similar situation and having that shared sense of community. People who also do more than the recommended minimum of 150 minutes of activity per week report even higher quality of life.”

Exposure to Air Pollution Linked to Higher Heart Attack Risk

A new study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, suggests that exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) of air pollution can be a trigger for heart attacks.

To investigate the link between UFP and nonfatal heart attacks, the team of researchers analyzed data from air pollution monitoring sites of Augsburg in Germany from 2005 to 2015. They also compared these data with the cases of nonfatal heart attacks in the city during the same period.

The first author of the study Kai Chen, Ph.D., assistant professor at Yale School of Public Health in New Haven, CT, says: “This study confirms something that has long been suspected — air pollution’s tiny particles can play a role in serious heart disease. This is particularly true within the first few hours of exposure. Elevated levels of UFP are a serious public health concern.”

Risk of Heart Attack Peaks at 10pm on Christmas Eve Due to Stress

A new Swedish study finds that 10 pm on Christmas Eve is the peak time for the risk of having a heart attack, for the senior people and people with the existing issue in particular.heart attack peaks at 10 pm at Christmas eve

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed data from 283,014 cases of heart attack reported to Swedish hospitals between 1998 and 2013. They compared these data with the number of cases outside the holiday periods.

People older than 75 and those with existing conditions such as diabetes or heart disease belong to the category of the highest risk.

One of the researchers, David Erlinge from Lund University in Sweden, comments: “Interestingly, the pattern of increased risk in the morning which dominates the rest of the year was reversed at Christmas, with an increased risk in the evening, indicating that the stress and eating during the day triggered the heart attacks.”

7 Really Simple Things to Do to Lower the Risk of High Blood Pressure

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, kills quietly as there are not any obvious signs. It can be quite difficult to see outer signs of high pressure building up in a person’s blood vessels. And extra stress on arteries normally leads to a heart attack, a stroke, or heart failure.fruits and veggies good for high blood pressure

Here is what you can do to reduce the risk of high blood pressure:

  1. Spend more time with family and friends.
  2. Do aerobic exercises.
  3. Drink less alcohol.
  4. Reduce the size of your waistline.
  5. Cut intake of salt and add more fresh fruits and vegetables.
  6. Reduce the level of stress and get enough sleep.
  7. Quit smoking.

Risk of Heart Attack Connected to Certain Blood Types

A new study suggests that the certain blood types might be connected to increased or decreased risk of having heart attack in response to high levels of air pollution.blood types

A team of researchers analyzed data from Intermountain Healthcare patients seen between 1993 and 2007 and concluded that a variant ABO gene, which can be found in blood types A, B, ad AB, has been associated with elevated risk of heart attack during periods of significant air pollution. People with blood type O demonstrated lower risk.

Clinical epidemiologist Benjamin Horne from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, US, explains: “In the information, we provide to our patients about pollution, we try to stress that they can do something about it to reduce their risks. Stay indoors out of pollution. Exercise indoors. And make sure they’re compliant with taking their heart medication to reduce their risk.”