Regular Physical Activity Can Halve the Risk of Heart Attack

physical activity for cardiovascular health

Recent research, published in the European Heart Journal, finds that physical activity can decrease the risk of a heart attack in healthy people by half.

A team of researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s Cardiac Exercise Research Group in Trondheim analyzed the cardiorespiratory fitness of more than 4,500 people who participated in the health survey HUNT3. Nobody had a history of cardiovascular disease, lung disease, or hypertension.

Bjarne Nes, the lead researcher of the study, comments: “Our study shows that poorer fitness is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease, even among healthy women and men who are relatively fit.”

Risk of Heart Attack Peaks at 10pm on Christmas Eve Due to Stress

A new Swedish study finds that 10 pm on Christmas Eve is the peak time for the risk of having a heart attack, for the senior people and people with the existing issue in particular.heart attack peaks at 10 pm at Christmas eve

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed data from 283,014 cases of heart attack reported to Swedish hospitals between 1998 and 2013. They compared these data with the number of cases outside the holiday periods.

People older than 75 and those with existing conditions such as diabetes or heart disease belong to the category of the highest risk.

One of the researchers, David Erlinge from Lund University in Sweden, comments: “Interestingly, the pattern of increased risk in the morning which dominates the rest of the year was reversed at Christmas, with an increased risk in the evening, indicating that the stress and eating during the day triggered the heart attacks.”

Living on a Tree-Lined Street Close to a Park Boosts Your Heart Health

According to a recent study, living on a tree-lined street close to a park may protect you from heart disease, stroke, and premature death.a tree-lined street boosts your heart health

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed the heart health of more than 400 people across the USA with the help of urine and blood samples. The analysis showed that people who live in green areas have healthier hearts, a higher capacity to repair blood vessels and less stress.

Lead author Aruni Bhatnagar, professor of medicine and director of the University of Louisville Diabetes and Obesity Center: “Our study shows that living in a neighborhood dense with trees, bushes, and other green vegetation may be good for the health of your heart and blood vessels.”

Three Servings of Dairy a Day May Cut the Risk of Heart Disease

New research, conducted by a team of scientists from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, finds that people who consume three servings of dairy, including milk, cheese, butter, or cream, a day are almost two times less likely to suffer from heart disease and strokes than people who consume less dairy.dairy cuts the risk of heart disease

For their study, the researchers analyzed the data from more than 136,000 people from 21 countries aged between 35 and 70 who had taken part in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study. The study focused on environmental, societal, and biological effects on obesity and chronic health issues.

Dr. Mahshid Meghan, a senior research associate at McMaster University, explains: “What I really want to emphasize is that consumption shouldn’t be discouraged but encouraged especially in low-income countries and even in high-income countries where consumption is low. We are not saying people eating seven servings of dairy a day should increase their intake, but that three servings – moderation – is good for you.’

A Large-Scale Study Confirms the Cardiovascular Benefits of Walnuts

A large-scale review of clinical trials for the past 25 years confirms that walnuts are the great choice for people who want to support their cardiovascular health.cardiovascular benefits of walnuts

The scientists reviewed 26 randomized studies with 1,059 participants in total whose age was from 22 to 75. The benefits of a diet rich in walnuts were compared to low-fat, Western, Mediterranean, and Japanese diets.

The analysis showed that a diet rich in walnuts had 3.25% greater reduction in total cholesterol levels, 3.73% greater decrease in LDL cholesterol, and 5.52% greater reduction of triglycerides.

Dr. Michael Roizen, the chief wellness officer in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, says: “This updated review further strengthens the case that enjoying walnuts is a great (and tasty) way to add important nutrients to your diet while supporting the health of your heart.”

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