7 Really Simple Things to Do to Lower the Risk of High Blood Pressure

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, kills quietly as there are not any obvious signs. It can be quite difficult to see outer signs of high pressure building up in a person’s blood vessels. And extra stress on arteries normally leads to a heart attack, a stroke, or heart failure.fruits and veggies good for high blood pressure

Here is what you can do to reduce the risk of high blood pressure:

  1. Spend more time with family and friends.
  2. Do aerobic exercises.
  3. Drink less alcohol.
  4. Reduce the size of your waistline.
  5. Cut intake of salt and add more fresh fruits and vegetables.
  6. Reduce the level of stress and get enough sleep.
  7. Quit smoking.

Leafy Greens and Whole Grains Help Lower the Risk of Heart Failure

A new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, US, finds that those individuals that consume mostly vegetables and fruits have a significantly lower risk of developing heart failure.leafy greens may help decrease the risk of heart failure

For the research, a team of scientists analyzed the medical data from 15,569 participants in the study called Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke that included both white and black adults from the US aged from 45 and more.

First study author Dr. Kyla Lara says: “Eating a diet mostly of dark green leafy plants, fruits, beans, whole grains, and fish, while limiting processed meats, saturated fats, trans fats, refined carbohydrates, and foods high in added sugars is a heart-healthy lifestyle and may specifically help prevent heart failure if you don’t already have it.”

Colder Weather Could Increase the Risk of Heart Failure in Senior People

According to the study from Université Laval and Université de Sherbrooke in Quebec, Canada, dropping temperatures and changes in atmospheric pressure can lead to an increase in the risk of heart failure for elderly people.cold weather increases the risk of heart failure

The scientists believe that senior people with a higher chance of heart failure should avoid fog and low cloud in the winter months.

The team of researchers looked at 112,793 people, aged 65 years and above, with the diagnosis of heart failure in Quebec between 2001 and 2011.

Across an average of 635 days, the participants of the study were monitored, and readings for temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure and air pollutants were also measured. Having analyzed the received data, the scientists revealed a higher risk of hospitalization or death in the winter (October to April) compared to the summer (May to September).

Big and Tall Women Are at Higher Risk of Developing Atrial Fibrillation

According to a recent preliminary study, big or tall women are around 3 times more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than smaller women. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat that develops in the atria, the two upper chambers of the heart. The quivering heartbeat increases the risk of stroke, heart failure, and other heart rhythm problems.atrial fibrillation

For their study, the researchers gathered information on women with a first pregnancy (average age 28) from a national birth registry. The registry contained data on women’s height and weight, which the researchers used to determine each woman’s body surface size.

The scientists followed the women for 16 years. During that period, more than 7,000 women were hospitalized with atrial fibrillation. The average age was 49 years. Having analyzed the received data, the researchers concluded that the largest women had 2.6-times higher risk of the condition of compared to the smallest women.

Common Painkillers Linked to the Higher Risk of Heart Failure in Seniors

A new study says that common painkillers may increase the risk of heart failure. Such non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, as ibuprofen, naproxen, and diclofenac, are widely used for treatment of pain and inflammation.common painkillers

For their study, the researcher have analysed data for the 10 million users from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Italy and Germany, and compared them with data of people who have never taken this kind of drugs.

The researchers from University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy, found taking NSAIDs increased the risk of being taken to hospital with heart failure by 19%. Since most people in the study were seniors – and those on NSAIDs were, in general, in poorer health – UK health experts suggested the findings had very little relevance for most patients under 65, but may be a concern for elderly patients.

More information about the study here.