Living on a Tree-Lined Street Close to a Park Boosts Your Heart Health

According to a recent study, living on a tree-lined street close to a park may protect you from heart disease, stroke, and premature death.a tree-lined street boosts your heart health

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed the heart health of more than 400 people across the USA with the help of urine and blood samples. The analysis showed that people who live in green areas have healthier hearts, a higher capacity to repair blood vessels and less stress.

Lead author Aruni Bhatnagar, professor of medicine and director of the University of Louisville Diabetes and Obesity Center: “Our study shows that living in a neighborhood dense with trees, bushes, and other green vegetation may be good for the health of your heart and blood vessels.”

Atrial Fibrillation Connected to the Higher Risk of Dementia

A new study, conducted by scientists from the Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, Sweden, suggests that atrial fibrillation is associated with the increased risk of developing dementia.atrial fibrillation connected to dementia

For the study, a team of researchers has analyzed the data of 2,685 participants whose average age was 73 years. The scientists interviewed the participants and conducted a medical examination at baseline. After that, the participants younger than 78 was followed for 6 years, and the participants older than 78 were examined every 3 years.

The researchers explain in their paper: “Assuming that there was a cause-and-effect relationship between using blood thinners and the reduced risk of dementia, we estimated that about 54 percent of the dementia cases would have been hypothetically prevented if all of the people with atrial fibrillation had been taking blood thinners.”

Regular Bedtime Linked to Better Heart Health and Metabolism

According to a recent study, completed by the scientists from the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, USA, regular bedtime is important for heart health and metabolism.regular bedtime linked to better heart health and metabolism

A team of scientists examined the sleeping patterns of approximately 2,000 adults aged between 54 and 93. None of them had a history of sleep disorders. Having analyzed the received data, the researchers found that volunteers with irregular bedtime had a higher body mass index, the higher level of blood sugar and blood pressure, as well as increased levels of hemoglobin A1C.

The lead researcher Jessica Lunsford-Avery, Ph. D., an assistant professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences from the Duke University Medical Center, says: “Heart disease and diabetes are extremely common in the United States, are extremely costly and also are leading causes of death in this country. To the extent we can predict individuals at risk for these diseases, we may be able to prevent or delay their onset.”

Better Heart Health Associated with Lower Risk of Dementia

According to a French study, recently published in JAMA, senior people with better heart health have the lower risk of developing dementia and cognitive decline.better heart health linked to lower risk of dementia

For the study, the researchers followed 6,626 people aged 65 years and over for 8.5 years on average. The followed people lived in Bordeaux, Dijon, and Montpellier (France). The average age was 73.7 years. None of the followed had dementia or cardiovascular disease.

The researchers conclude in their study: “These findings may support the promotion of cardiovascular health to prevent risk factors associated with cognitive decline and dementia.”

To maintain good cardiovascular health, you should comply with the following recommendations: give up smoking; be physically active; include vegetables, fruit, and fish into your diet; keep your weight healthy; keep an eye on your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar.

Four Cups of Coffee Daily Might Protect Cells of the Heart

Scientists from Heinrich-Heine-University and the IUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine in Düsseldorf, Germany, suggest that consuming the amount of caffeine equivalent to four cups of coffee might be enough to protect the cells of the heart.four cups of coffee protect heart

In the study, the scientists discovered a new enzyme within mitochondria appearing to be relevant to caffeine’s protecting effect: p27. Using the mice models, the researchers found that caffeine protected against heart damage in prediabetic, older, and obese mice.

Lead researchers Judith Haendeler concludes: “These results should lead to better strategies for protecting heart muscle from damage, including consideration of coffee consumption or caffeine as an additional dietary factor in the elderly population.”

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