Regular Exercising May Keep Your Heart and Main Arteries Young

According to a recent study, published in The Journal of Physiology, exercising four to five times per week may help stop the main arteries to the heart from stiffening up.exercising may keep main arteries young

The researchers from the US have found that those who exercise four to five times per week had healthier large central arteries and healthier middle-sized ones.

Lead author of the study Dr. Benjamin Levine of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine in Dallas, USA, explains: “This work is really exciting because it enables us to develop exercise programs to keep the heart youthful and even turn back time on older hearts and blood vessels.”

16 Foods That Are the Best for Your Heart Health, According to Experts

It is well known that our overall health and wellbeing are totally dependable on what we eat. That is why a healthy diet plays a significant role in keeping the body healthy. Day after day, scientists all over the world make new discoveries proving that certain products may be beneficial for certain systems of our body.food for your heart health

The health experts from the US highlighted 16 foods, when included in a well-balanced healthy diet, might help maintain your heart health. Here are the best foods to consume regularly:

  1. Asparagus.
  2. Beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils.
  3. Berries.
  4. Broccoli.
  5. Chia seeds and flaxseeds.
  6. Dark chocolate.
  7. Coffee.
  8. Fish high in omega-3 fatty acids.
  9. Green tea.
  10. Nuts.
  11. Liver.
  12. Oatmeal.
  13. Red wine.
  14. Tomatoes.
  15. Spinach.
  16. Vegetables.

New Study Proves that You Can Die from a Broken Heart

A recent research, published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, finds that in the three-month period after a spouse’s death widows and widowers are at higher risk of death associated with cardiovascular disease.broken heart

The study found that people who have lost a spouse within the last three months have higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (immune markers indicating inflammation in the bloodstream) and lower heart rate variability (HRV) than those non-bereaved individuals of the same sex, age, body mass index, and education level.

Lead author Chris Fagundes, an assistant professor of psychology in Rice University’s School of Social Sciences, USA, says: “In the first six months after the loss of a spouse, widows/widowers are at a 41% increased risk of mortality. Importantly, 53% of this increased risk is due to cardiovascular disease. This study is an important step toward understanding why this is the case by identifying how bereavement gets under the skin to promote morbidity and mortality.”

A Handful of Pecans a Day May Improve Your Heart Health

The latest research, published in the journal Nutrients, explained how pecans may improve heart health and described the numerous benefits of consuming this nut. The study was executed by the team of scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Medford.handful-pecans-improve-heart-health

For their study, the researchers recruited 26 men and women, who were overweight or obese but otherwise healthy. The participants spent 4 weeks on one diet and then switched to another diet for the remaining 4 weeks. One of the diets was a control diet where 15% of the total calorie count were pecans. The researchers found that adding pecans to the participants’ diets improved insulin sensitivity.

Lead researcher Diane McKay, Ph.D., explains: “Pecans are naturally high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, so replacing a portion of the saturated fat in the diet with these healthier fats can explain some of the cardioprotective effect we observed.”

Adding Lentils to Meals May Help Fight High Blood Pressure

According to a recent research from the University of Manitoba, lentils in your meal may successfully fight high blood pressure, scientifically called hypertension.

The researchers also found that eating lentils can reverse declines in blood vessel health. The results of the study were presented at the annual conference of the American Heart Association, held in Dallas, USA.

Dr. Peter Zahradka, one of the lead authors of the two experiments on the effects of lentils, believes that the results are amazing. He also adds: “[The results] provide a non-pharmacological way of treating diseases associated with blood vessel dysfunction.”