Lifting Weights for Less than an Hour a Week Is Good for Heart Health

New research, executed by scientists from Iowa State University, finds that lifting weights for less than an hour once a week may lower the risk of heart attack or stroke by 40–70%. The researchers also add that performing weight exercises for more than an hour doesn’t provide any additional effect.Exercising with dumbells at gym

To make this conclusion, the researchers analyzed data from about 13,000 adults in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study measuring three health outcomes: cardiovascular events, heart attack and stroke in particular, that didn’t result in death, all cardiovascular events that resulted in death.

DC (Duck-chul) Lee, an associate professor of kinesiology explains: “Lifting any weight that increases resistance on your muscles is the key. My muscle doesn’t know the difference if I’m digging in the yard, carrying heavy shopping bags or lifting a dumbbell.”

A Handful of Nuts 3 Times per Week May Cut the Risk of Irregular Heartbeat

A large Swedish study suggests that eating a handful of nuts three times a week may reduce the risk of developing an irregular heartbeat, which is considered to be a major cause of stroke.nuts cut risk of irregular heartbeat

For the study, a team of researchers from Karolinska Institute looked at over 60,000 Swedish adults and tracked their consumption of nuts and almonds, as well as their heart health during about 17 years. Having analyzed the received data, the scientists concluded that eating nuts were associated with lower risk of heart attack and stroke.

The authors of the study concluded: “Since only a small proportion of this population had moderate (about 5%) or high (less than 2%) nut consumption, even a small increase in nut consumption may have large potential to lead to a reduction in incidence of atrial fibrillation and heart failure in this population.”

New Study Proves that You Can Die from a Broken Heart

A recent research, published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, finds that in the three-month period after a spouse’s death widows and widowers are at higher risk of death associated with cardiovascular disease.broken heart

The study found that people who have lost a spouse within the last three months have higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (immune markers indicating inflammation in the bloodstream) and lower heart rate variability (HRV) than those non-bereaved individuals of the same sex, age, body mass index, and education level.

Lead author Chris Fagundes, an assistant professor of psychology in Rice University’s School of Social Sciences, USA, says: “In the first six months after the loss of a spouse, widows/widowers are at a 41% increased risk of mortality. Importantly, 53% of this increased risk is due to cardiovascular disease. This study is an important step toward understanding why this is the case by identifying how bereavement gets under the skin to promote morbidity and mortality.”

Cruciferous Vegetables May Cut the Risk of Stroke in Elderly Women

Australian study claims that vegetables of the cruciferous group which includes broccoli, cauliflower, kale, turnips, sprouts, bok choi, and greens, can reduce the risk of stroke in elderly women.cruciferous vegetables for elderly women

For the study, a team of researchers from the University of Western Australia in Crawley, distributed food questionnaires to 954 women aged 70 and over. After that, they performed ultrasound tests to measure the thickness of their carotid arteries.

The lead author of the study Dr. Lauren Blekkenhorst says: “This is one of only a few studies that have explored the potential impact of different types of vegetables on measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease. After adjusting for lifestyle, cardiovascular disease risk factors (including medication use) as well as other vegetable types and dietary factors, our results continued to show a protective association between cruciferous vegetables and carotid artery wall thickness.”

Leafy Greens and Whole Grains Help Lower the Risk of Heart Failure

A new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, US, finds that those individuals that consume mostly vegetables and fruits have a significantly lower risk of developing heart failure.leafy greens may help decrease the risk of heart failure

For the research, a team of scientists analyzed the medical data from 15,569 participants in the study called Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke that included both white and black adults from the US aged from 45 and more.

First study author Dr. Kyla Lara says: “Eating a diet mostly of dark green leafy plants, fruits, beans, whole grains, and fish, while limiting processed meats, saturated fats, trans fats, refined carbohydrates, and foods high in added sugars is a heart-healthy lifestyle and may specifically help prevent heart failure if you don’t already have it.”

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