New Study Proves that You Can Die from a Broken Heart

A recent research, published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, finds that in the three-month period after a spouse’s death widows and widowers are at higher risk of death associated with cardiovascular disease.broken heart

The study found that people who have lost a spouse within the last three months have higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (immune markers indicating inflammation in the bloodstream) and lower heart rate variability (HRV) than those non-bereaved individuals of the same sex, age, body mass index, and education level.

Lead author Chris Fagundes, an assistant professor of psychology in Rice University’s School of Social Sciences, USA, says: “In the first six months after the loss of a spouse, widows/widowers are at a 41% increased risk of mortality. Importantly, 53% of this increased risk is due to cardiovascular disease. This study is an important step toward understanding why this is the case by identifying how bereavement gets under the skin to promote morbidity and mortality.”

Cruciferous Vegetables May Cut the Risk of Stroke in Elderly Women

Australian study claims that vegetables of the cruciferous group which includes broccoli, cauliflower, kale, turnips, sprouts, bok choi, and greens, can reduce the risk of stroke in elderly women.cruciferous vegetables for elderly women

For the study, a team of researchers from the University of Western Australia in Crawley, distributed food questionnaires to 954 women aged 70 and over. After that, they performed ultrasound tests to measure the thickness of their carotid arteries.

The lead author of the study Dr. Lauren Blekkenhorst says: “This is one of only a few studies that have explored the potential impact of different types of vegetables on measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease. After adjusting for lifestyle, cardiovascular disease risk factors (including medication use) as well as other vegetable types and dietary factors, our results continued to show a protective association between cruciferous vegetables and carotid artery wall thickness.”

Leafy Greens and Whole Grains Help Lower the Risk of Heart Failure

A new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, US, finds that those individuals that consume mostly vegetables and fruits have a significantly lower risk of developing heart failure.leafy greens may help decrease the risk of heart failure

For the research, a team of scientists analyzed the medical data from 15,569 participants in the study called Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke that included both white and black adults from the US aged from 45 and more.

First study author Dr. Kyla Lara says: “Eating a diet mostly of dark green leafy plants, fruits, beans, whole grains, and fish, while limiting processed meats, saturated fats, trans fats, refined carbohydrates, and foods high in added sugars is a heart-healthy lifestyle and may specifically help prevent heart failure if you don’t already have it.”

Cholesterol-Lowering Vaccine Is Being Tested on Human Volunteers

A team of researchers from the Medical University of Vienna is in the process of testing the safety of their experimental cholesterol-lowering vaccine in 72 volunteers. This vaccine, successfully tested in mice, can help prevent heart disease in the future.cholesterol-lowering vaccine

The treatment was designed to stop deposits of fat from clogging the arteries. It can be an alternative way to lower the risk of stroke, angina, and heart attacks.

Dr. Guenther Staffler and his colleagues from The Netherlands Organisation of Applied Scientific Research explain that it will take years more of testing to know if the treatment will be safe and effective enough to use. The scientists also add that this medication is not an excuse for people to avoid exercise and eat high-fat food.

High Doses of Common Painkillers Linked to Higher Risk of Heart Attack

A recent study, published in The BMJ, suggests that people who commonly take high doses of common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers, or NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, could be at a higher risk of a heart attack.painkillers linked to heart attack

An international team of researchers with Michele Bally of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center as a leader of the study analyzed health care data of 446,763 people from Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom, among whom 61,460 had a heart attack.

High doses were considered as following: > 200 mg for Celecoxib (Celebrex), > 100 mg for Diclofenac (Voltaren, Cambia, Solaraze), > 1200 mg for Ibuprofen (Advil), > 750 mg for Naproxen (Midol, Aleve, Naprelan).

Deepak Bhatt, M.D., executive director of an interventional cardiovascular program at Brigham and Women’s hospital, says: “The bottom line [of the study] is, don’t treat these drugs like candy just because they’re sold over the counter said. Treat them like any medications. Only use them if you really need to, lowest dose possible, for least amount of time.”