A Chemical Added to Packaged Food Make Fight against Flu Harder

A new study from Michigan State University in East Lansing suggests that a chemical used in packaged food to keep it fresh longer can weaken the immune response of the body in the fight against flu.A Chemical Added to Packaged Food Make Fight against Flu Harder

With the help of mouse model, the researchers found that helper and killer T-cells activated more slowly in the rodents that had eaten a diet with a high content of tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), and it took longer for the body to clear off the virus.

The author of the study Robert Freeborn says: “In our mouse model, tBHQ suppressed the function of two types of T cells: helper and killer T cells. Ultimately, this led to more severe symptoms during subsequent influenza infection.”

Gut Microbiome Can Boost the Immune System to Fight Cancer

A recent international study, published in Nature Communications, finds that gut microbiome can boost the immune system’s ability to fight cancer.gut microbiome boosts immune system to fight cancer

During the study, a team of researchers identified 11 strains of gut bacteria which helped the immune system to slow down the growth of melanoma tumors in mice. The scientists highlighted a signaling pathway called unfolded protein response (UPR) as a major link between the gut bacteria and the fighting ability of the immune system.

Senior study author Ze’ev Ronai, a professor at Sanford Burnham Prebys, says: “These results […] identify a collection of bacterial strains that could turn on antitumor immunity and biomarkers that could be used to stratify people with melanoma for treatment with select checkpoint inhibitors.”

Study Confirms that Microplastics Accumulate in Human Faeces

A new study from Austria finds evidence that microplastics, such as extremely small pieces of plastic beads, fibers, or fragments, accumulate in human feces.microplastics-accumulate-in-human-feces

A team of scientist from the Environment Agency Austria and the Medical University of Vienna has analyzed the samples of excrements of eight participants from Italy, Japan, Poland, the Netherlands, Russia, the United Kingdom, Finland, and Austria.

All participants reported what they ate or drank within the week prior to the sampling. They all drank from plastic bottles and ate plastic-wrapped foods. According to the study, the sea animals consume plastic, humans are likely to ingest it by eating tuna, shrimp, or lobster.

The scientists report that the microplastics may take part in transmittance of toxic chemicals and pathogens to the human body which can lead to the weakening of the immune response of the gut.

These 15 Foods Are the Best to Boost the Immune System

A human immune system consists of various cells, tissues, and proteins. In the system, they carry out the processes in our body that fight with pathogens — viruses, bacteria, and foreign bodies. When a pathogen comes into contact with the immune system, the latter releases antibodies to attack pathogens and kill them. The following fifteen foods will help you to boost your immune system:15 foods to boost immune system

  1. Blueberries.
  2. Dark chocolate.
  3. Turmeric.
  4. Oily fish.
  5. Broccoli.
  6. Sweet potatoes.
  7. Spinach.
  8. Ginger.
  9. Garlic.
  10. Green tea.
  11. Kefir.
  12. Sunflower seeds.
  13. Almonds.
  14. Oranges and kiwis.
  15. Red bell pepper.

A Diet Rich in Whole Grains May Lead to Healthier Gut and Better Immunity

According to a recent study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, eating a diet that includes whole grains leads to healthier gut and stronger immune system. Whole grains include such products as whole wheat, oats, rye, barley, brown rice, and quinoa.whole grains lead to healthier gut

In the study, 81 healthy adults participated. All of them ate a Western-style diet high in refined grains during the first two weeks (the study lasted for 8 weeks). During the other 6 weeks, half of the participants continued a Western-style diet, and another half ate the same diet, but instead of refined grains, they consumed whole grains.

Having analyzed the results of the study, the scientists found that those who consumed the diet rich in whole grains showed an increase in a type of bacteria called Lachnospira, which is known to produce short-chain fatty acids. Moreover, those who consumed the whole-grain diet showed a reduction Enterobacteriaceae, bacteria that trigger inflammation.

All original content on these pages is fingerprinted and certified by Digiprove