Cinnamon Could Help in Treating Resistant Bacterial Infections

A team of scientists from the Swinburne University of Technology in Australia finds that cinnamon may help in treating resistant bacterial infections breaking up their biofilms — sticky layers that are usually responsible for persistent infections that cannot be broken by antibiotics.cinnamon could help in treating resistant bacterial infections

For experiments, the scientists used Pseudomonas aeroginosa, a bacterium commonly responsible for infections in people with weakened immune systems including patients with cancer, diabetes, or cystic fibrosis.

The lead researcher of the study Dr. Sanjida Topa says: “These findings definitely contribute to the search for novel antimicrobials. […] Fabrication of cinnamaldehyde for surface treatments, for example [to treat] skin infections, could be the first direct application.”

Travelling by Plane Is the Fastest Way for Infectious Diseases to Spread

A new study, conducted by the researchers from Arizona State University, USA, finds that traveling by plane is the fastest way for infectious diseases to spread. The spreading speed depends on such factors as place size and boarding method.Infectious Diseases

The researchers created a model simulating the spread of Ebola infection. The model can predict how many passengers would get an infection after using one of several different boarding methods. It also evaluates the influence of such factors as deplaning methods and plane size.

In their study, the researchers note: “Safer options include the two-section, random method, where the plane is divided into two lengthwise sections and passengers board randomly within those sections.”

Brazilian Peppertree May Help Fight Deadly Superbugs

A new study, executed by the team of scientists from Emory University, finds that red berries of the Brazilian peppertree contain a substance able to fight deadly superbugs.peppertree fights deadly superbugs

For the study, the scientists separated the ingredients of the berries to see if they could prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in mice. The MRSA is a drug-resistant superbug posing a risk to hospital patients. The researchers injected all rodents with the bacteria and gave the plant compound to some of them. Those rodents that received plant compound inhibited the growth of lesions.

Lead researcher Cassandra Quave, an assistant professor in Emory’s Center for the Study of Human Health and in the School of Medicine’s Department of Dermatology, says: “We’re really at an urgent time for discovery of new chemical matter and new mechanisms for dealing with infectious diseases because we are standing on the precipice of a post-antibiotic era.”