Three to Four Cups of Coffee Daily Associated with Longer Life

According to the research, published in The BMJ, analyzing the findings of 200 studies, three to four cups of coffee every day can be associated with longer life and lower risk of some cancers, diabetes, liver disease, and dementia.coffee linked to longer life

Nevertheless, the scientists say that drinking coffee in pregnancy is linked to harms and can be connected to the slightly increased risk of fracture in women.

The authors conclude that drinking coffee seems safe within usual patterns of consumption, except during pregnancy and in women with higher risk of fracture. At the same time, coffee is often consumed with products rich in refined sugars and unhealthy fats which may independently contribute to adverse health outcomes.

Too Much Soda Increases the Risk of Fatty Liver Disease in Kids

A new study, published in the Journal of Hematology, adds to the growing body of evidence that consuming too high amount of sweetened beverages linked to the higher risk of fatty liver disease in children.soda increases risk of liver disease

Having studied 271 obese children and adolescents within the study, the researchers found that children and adolescents who consumed high amounts of fructose, mostly from sweetened beverages, were more likely to have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Senior investigator Dr. Valerio Nobili, of the Bambino Gesu Hospital in Italy, says: “In the study, we show for the first time that uric acid concentrations and dietary fructose consumption are independently and positively associated with NASH.”

Just One Meal High in Saturated Fat May Seriously Harm Liver

A small German study finds that a meal high in saturated fat, for example, a cheeseburger with fries or a pizza, may disrupt liver function.saturated fat

A team of researchers discovered that the high levels of saturated fat immediately change the way our liver works, leading for serious diseases in the future.

Dr. Michael Roden, a study co-author and a scientific director of the German Diabetes Center at Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf, says:  “Our findings paint the picture of the earliest changes in liver metabolism leading to fatty liver diseases and liver cirrhosis in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes.”

More information about the study is here.

6 Important Things You Need to Know about Your Liver

Liver is the biggest internal organ of a human body, and technically it is also the biggest gland. As a rule, when people think about the problems with liver, wthey think about cirrhosis, a pattern of chronic scarring of the liver that blocks blood flow and halts its many essential processes. The condition commonly associated with the excessive alcohol consumption.important things

Robert S. Brown Jr., a gastroenterology and hepatology professor at Weill Cornell Medicine’s Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation in New York, says: “People think their livers really can only be a problem if they do something wrong to it. Liver disease cuts across all socioeconomic statuses, genders, ages – everyone needs to take good care of their livers.”

Here are 6 important things you should always remember about the liver:
  1. Not all liver diseases are related to alcohol.
  2. You can’t live without your liver.
  3. The liver regenerates.
  4. Your birthday might predict your risk of getting Hepatitis C.
  5. You might not notice any symptoms of liver disease.
  6. Your liver doing the detox for you.

More details about these facts are here.

Overweight Young Men May Have the Risk of Liver Disease Later

Excess weight at the age from 18 to 20 may be a signal that a man may have the risk of liver disease decades later, a large long-term study from Sweden suggests.liver disease

In their study, researchers followed more than 44,000 men conscripted for military service in 1969 and 1970 and discovered that those who were overweight as young men were 64% more likely to have serious problems with liver and liver-related deaths in the next 40 years compared to their counterparts with a healthy weight.

“Most likely, these teens already had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) at the start of the study, or developed it down the road,” says the lead author, Dr. Hannes Hagstrom of the Center for Digestive Diseases at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. “We know that some persons with NAFLD do develop severe liver disease.”

More details here.