Consuming More Flavonoids May Cut Cancer Risk and Extend Life

A new study by the scientists from Edith Cowan University in Australia finds that a diet rich in flavonoids may help reduce the risk of cancer and extend life. Flavonoids can be found in vegetables, fruits, dark chocolate, red wine, and tea.Consuming More Flavonoids May Cut Cancer Risk and Extend Life

To study the influence of consuming more flavonoids, the researchers took data of 56,048 adults from the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort who were followed for 23 years.

Having completed the analysis of the received data, the authors of the study concluded: “[W]e provide evidence that an achievable dietary intake of total and individual flavonoid subclasses is associated with a lower risk of all cause, [cardiovascular disease]-related, and cancer-related mortality.”

Increased Muscle Power May Help You Live Longer

A new study from Exercise Medicine Clinic — CLINIMEX, Brazil, suggests that increased muscle power may help people live longer.increased muscle power connected to loger life

The study included 3,878 participants aged from 41 to 85 years, none of whom was an athlete. Maximal muscle power of each participant was checked with the help of upright row exercise from 2001 to 2016.

The participants were separated into quartiles according to their muscle power and followed for approximately 6.5 years. During this period, 247 and 75 women died.

Having performed the detailed analysis, the researchers concluded that the participants in quartile one had a risk of dying 10 to 13 times higher compared to the risk of those in quartiles three and four with the maximal levels of muscle power.

Regularly Playing Tennis May Add Almost 10 Years to Your Life

A new study, executed by Saint Luke’s Health Center in Kansas City, suggests that people playing tennis regularly could live an average 9.7 years longer than those who don’t exercise at all. In addition, badminton players could live 6.2 years and football players almost 5 years longer.playing tennis may add 10 years to your life

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed data from 8,577 people from the Copenhagen City Heart Study which began in 1975 and included adults whose age was from 20 to 93. The participants were followed for 25 years.

Study author James O’Keefe explains: “We know from other research that social support provides stress mitigation, so being with other people, playing and interacting with them, as you do when you play games that require a partner or a team, probably has unique psychological and physiological effects. Raising your heart rate is important, but it looks like connecting with other people is, too.”

Walking Faster May Help You Live Longer, a Big Study Says

According to a new study, executed by an international team of scientists from the University of Sydney in Australia, the University of Limerick in Ireland, and the Universities of the Cambridge, Edinburgh, and Ulster, UK, those people who walk fast may have higher chances to live longer.walking fast may help you live longer

For the research, the scientists analyzed 11 population-based surveys conducted in the United Kingdom between 1994 and 2008 from 50,552 walkers. The analysis showed that an average walking pace was associated with a 20% lower risk of death from all causes while walking fast, about 5–7 km per hour, was linked to 24% lower risk.

Lead researchers Prof. Emmanuel Stamatakis says: “Especially in situations when walking more isn’t possible due to time pressures or a less walking-friendly environment, walking faster may be a good option to get the heart rate up — one that most people can easily incorporate into their lives.”

Three to Four Cups of Coffee Daily Associated with Longer Life

According to the research, published in The BMJ, analyzing the findings of 200 studies, three to four cups of coffee every day can be associated with longer life and lower risk of some cancers, diabetes, liver disease, and dementia.coffee linked to longer life

Nevertheless, the scientists say that drinking coffee in pregnancy is linked to harms and can be connected to the slightly increased risk of fracture in women.

The authors conclude that drinking coffee seems safe within usual patterns of consumption, except during pregnancy and in women with higher risk of fracture. At the same time, coffee is often consumed with products rich in refined sugars and unhealthy fats which may independently contribute to adverse health outcomes.