A Compound in Chili Pepper May Stop Lung Cancer Metastasis

According to a new study from the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine in Huntington, capsaicin, the pungent compound in chili pepper, can help stop lung cancer metastasis.chili pepper to fight lung cancer metastasis

Scientists tested the compound in three cultured lines of human non-small cells of lung cancer. They discovered that capsaicin stopped the first stage of metastasis that is also called “invasion.”

The researchers write in their paper: “Our results show that capsaicin directly interacts with Src and inhibits Src activation to suppress the metastasis of [lung cancer]. The results of our studies may foster the development of novel anti-metastatic therapies for human [lung cancer].”

High Doses of Vitamin B Connected to Increased Risk of Lung Cancer

According to a new research, high doses of certain vitamins of group B connected to the increased risk of lung cancer in smoking men.increased risk

The study was conducted by the scientists from the Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute at the University Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC) in Columbus, USA, with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, USA, and National Taiwan University in Taipei.

The researchers reviewed data from 77,118 people between 2000 and 2002 when participants were aged from 50 to 76. Every person gave information concerning the use of vitamin B over previous 10 years.

Having analyzed the collected data, the researchers concluded that male smokers taking 20 mg of Vitamin B-6 daily for 10 years were 3 times more likely to go on to develop lung cancer, and those male smokers taking 55 mg of Vitamin B-12 daily for 10 years were about 4 times more likely to develop the condition.

Smokers with Particular Genetic Markers Are More Likely to Get Lung Cancer

Scientists from Hawaii found that smokers with particular genetic markers might have higher nicotine metabolism, increasing the quantity of smoke they can inhale and the risk of lung cancer correspondingly. They identified differences in the CYP2A6 gene that are linked to a high rate of nicotine metabolism.genetic markers

The higher nicotine metabolism is, the more cigarettes a person can smoke and inhale more nicotine per cigarette.

Dr. Loїc Le Marchand, a professor in the UH Cancer Center’s Epidemiology program, says: “Smokers with the genetic markers we discovered, smoke more extensively in order to keep their nicotine levels high and achieve the desired effects of nicotine in the brain.”

He also believes that this finding can help identify smokers who are at an increased risk of lung cancer.

More details here.

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