Quiet Rest after Learning Will Help to Memorize Details

A new study from the United Kingdom suggests that a simple quiet rest, just for 10 minutes, may help to memorize new information in fine detail.quiet rest

To study this effect, the researchers designed a memory test to assess the ability to keep finely graded information. For the experiment, the researchers took the information on memorizing from 60 young male and female participants whose average age was 21 years.

Michael Craig, a researcher from the Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, United Kingdom, says: “This new finding provides the first evidence that a brief period of quiet rest can help us to retain more detailed memories.”

Scientists Identified a Chemical Helping Us Suppress Undesired Thoughts

A team of scientists from the University of Cambridge has identified a chemical within the region of the brain responsible for memory that allows us to suppress undesired thoughts. This helps explain why people with anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and schizophrenia often have persistent intrusive thoughts when these circuits go wrong.Suppress Undesired Thoughts

In their study, the researchers used a task known as the ‘Think/No-Think’ procedure to identify a significant new brain process enabling the prefrontal cortex to successfully inhibit our thoughts.

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the scientists managed to observe what was happening within the key regions of the brain as the participants tried to inhibit their thoughts. The researchers were able to measure brain chemistry with the help of spectroscopy.

Ketogenic Diet May Boost Memory and Prolong Lifespan

Two new independent studies conducted in mice suggest that ketogenic diet, also known as “keto diet”, may improve the memory of old subjects and prolong lifespan.ketogenic diet

One study was led by Drs. Eric Verdin and John Newman from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, USA. Another study was led by Dr. John Ramsey from the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

Both studies checked the effects of four diet types such as ketogenic, low carbohydrate, high fat, and control diet in mice. A team of scientists from the Buck Institute found that a keto diet prevent obesity, reduced mid-life mortality, and prevented memory loss in mice.

Dr. John Ramsey says: “We expected some differences [in mice fed the keto diet], but I was impressed by the magnitude we observed – a 13% increase in median life span for the mice on a high-fat versus high-carb diet. In humans, that would be 7 to 10 years. But equally important, those mice retained quality of health in later life.”

Even Moderate Drinking Might Be Bad for Aging Brains

A recent research from the UK, published in the medical journal BMJ, suggests that even moderate drinking may cause changes in aging brains and lead to eventual memory loss.moderate drinking is bad for aging brains

Within the scope of the study, the scientists considered 8 to 12 small glasses of wine, bottles of beer or shots of liquor weekly as a moderate drinking. For their study, a team of researchers examined three decades of records from 527 British civil servants who were a part of a prolonged health study.

Lead researcher Anya Topiwala of the University of Oxford says: “I wouldn’t recommend light to moderate drinking as a strategy to avoid cognitive decline. It’s not clear how much drinking might be safe from a brain health standpoint.”

Mid-life Exercising Can Boost Your Brain Health, Study

A new research, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, suggests that a new exercise regimen, including aerobic and resistance training, can boost your brain health if you are over 50.exercise boosts brain health

For the study, a team of researchers reviewed 39 studies looking at the impact of such aerobic exercises as walking, running, and swimming, on thinking, alertness, information processing, executing goals and memory skills.

Study lead author Joseph Northey, a doctoral candidate and teaching fellow at the University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise in Australia, explains: “When we combined the available data from [39 previous] studies, we were able to show that undertaking physical exercise was able to improve the brain function of people aged 50 and over.”