Electrostimulation May Boost Working Memory in Senior People

A new study from Boston University, US, demonstrates that electrostimulation may improve the working memory in people in their 70s.electrostimulation boosts working memory

In the course of the study, the researchers asked a group of people in their 20s and a group in their 60s and 70s to complete a bunch of memory tasks requiring them to view an image, and then, after a short pause, to identify whether a second image was different from the first one.

At baseline, the results of the young participants were significantly higher than the results of the older group. However, when the older adults received 25 minutes of mild stimulation delivered through scalp electrodes and personalized to their individual brain circuits, the difference between the two groups vanished.

Musical Training May Improve Your Ability to Focus

A recent study from the Center for Advanced Research in Education at the University of Chile in Santiago finds that musical training may boost the ability to focus and avoid distractions.musical training boosts focus

For the study, the scientists asked 18 professionals musicians and 18 nonmusical people to pass a standard attentional network test. The researchers also measured the participants’ relative behavior by measuring how long it took for them to react to the image changes.

The results of the tests showed that people who were trained to be professional musicians on average were able to more quickly and accurately respond to and focus on performing the task.

Study co-author David Medina comments the received results: “Our findings of the relationship between musical training and improvement of attentional skills could be useful in clinical or educational fields.”

Light and Frequent Physical Exercise May Boost Mental Health

A new study from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, US, finds that light and frequent physical exercise can boost mental health in short- and long-term perspective.light and frequent physical activity boosts mental health

During the study, a bunch of volunteers agreed to undergo functional MRI scanning which measured their brain activity. Also, they completed tests that intended to assess their working memory.

The analysis of the received data showed that those participants who had the most improvements in brain network connectivity and the largest cognitive benefits after single workouts also had similarly important positive effects at the end of the training program.

Wendy Suzuki, of New York University in New York City, says: “There is a strong and direct link between physical activity and how your brain works. People still do not link physical health to the brain and cognitive health; they think about fitting into a bikini or losing that last pound, not about all the brain systems they are improving and enhancing every time they work out.”

Women Who Work Excessively Have Higher Risk of Depression

women who work excessively have risk of depression

A study, recently published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, finds that women who work excessively, 55 working hours or more per week, are at higher risk of developing depression.

To make this conclusion, a team of researchers examined data received from the United Kingdom Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS) that tracked health information of approximately 40,000 households in UK.

The researchers note that while men usually spend longer hours at work, women often have a “potential double burden” when performing household duties and caring for family members. This type of work is unpaid and increases their workload.

The authors of the study write: “Previous studies have found that once unpaid housework and caring is accounted for, women work longer than men, on average, and that this has been linked to poorer physical health.”

Quiet Environment Is Better for Creativity than Music

quiet environment is better for creativity

A new study suggests that quiet environment or background library noise is better for creativity than listening to music while performing the task.

A team of researchers from the University of Gävle, Sweden, and the University of Central Lancashire and Lancaster University, both in the UK, conducted a series of experiment that included human volunteers.

The authors of the study conclude in their paper: “[T]he findings here challenge the popular view that music enhances creativity, and instead demonstrate that music, regardless of the presence of semantic content (no lyrics, familiar lyrics, or unfamiliar lyrics), consistently disrupts creative performance in insight problem-solving.”

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