Atrial Fibrillation Connected to the Higher Risk of Dementia

A new study, conducted by scientists from the Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, Sweden, suggests that atrial fibrillation is associated with the increased risk of developing dementia.atrial fibrillation connected to dementia

For the study, a team of researchers has analyzed the data of 2,685 participants whose average age was 73 years. The scientists interviewed the participants and conducted a medical examination at baseline. After that, the participants younger than 78 was followed for 6 years, and the participants older than 78 were examined every 3 years.

The researchers explain in their paper: “Assuming that there was a cause-and-effect relationship between using blood thinners and the reduced risk of dementia, we estimated that about 54 percent of the dementia cases would have been hypothetically prevented if all of the people with atrial fibrillation had been taking blood thinners.”

Scientists Found a New Way to Treat Autism in Adults

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University, US, have found a new pathway in the brain associated with the behavioral symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a drug to quell these symptoms.scientists found a potential treatment for autism

The drug treated the behavioral disruptions in mice with autism. Scientists believe that it may have the same effect for adults with the condition.

Firstly, 25 years ago, it was discovered that a genetic mutation interferes with the serotonin regulation in people with autism. Serotonin is a key neurotransmitter to the feeling of happiness and plays important role in social functioning.

Then, a particular enzyme was found that had a drastic effect on the reabsorption of serotonin. After that, an experimental compound called MW150 was developed and tested on mice.

Talking to Kids from Early Age Could Promote Their Language Skills

According to the findings of a recent research, published in the JNeurosci, regular talking to young children associated with the stronger connections between two developing brain regions critical for language.talking for language skills

The research was held independently of parental income and education. This means that engaging children in a conversation from an early age may promote their language skills regardless of socioeconomic status.

For the study, the team of researchers analyzed data received from 40 of children aged from 4 to 6 years. The scientists discovered that greater conversational turn-taking was associated with the stronger connections between brain regions that are critical for the comprehension and production of speech (Wernicke’s area and Broca’s area).

Scientists Explained Why Smells Revoke Vivid Memories

Our brain combines smell with the information about space and time to form episodic vivid memories, according to a recent research, published in the journal Nature Communications. These findings can help improve sniff tests for the Alzheimer’s disease.smells are associated with vivid memories

In the course of the study, a team of researchers examined the role of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) in memory using a mouse model in a range of experiments. They discovered a previously unknown neural pathway between the hippocampus and the AON.

Study co-author Afif Aqrabawi says: “[The findings demonstrate] that we now understand which circuits in the brain govern the episodic memory for the smell. The circuit can now be used as a model to study fundamental aspects of human episodic memory and the other odor memory deficits seen in neurogenerative conditions.”

ADHD Symptoms in Teens Linked to Intensive Social Media Use

A new study, published in the medical journal JAMA, finds that the more teenagers involved in social media, the higher their risk is to develop the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These symptoms may include inattention, hyperactivity, restlessness or impulsivity that is more severe, frequent or debilitating compared to normal.ADHD symptoms linked to social media

In the study, 2,587 students from 10 high schools across Los Angeles County, USA, were included. The participants’ age was from 15 to 16 years. Nobody of them had significant symptoms of ADHD at the beginning of the study. They participated in the study for over 2 years.

The analysis of the received data showed that averagely 9.5% of the participants who were engaged in seven high-frequency digital media activities reported symptoms of ADHD; 10.5% of those who reported engaging in all 14 high-frequency digital media activities reported ADHD symptoms.