7 Delicious Winter Fruits to Add to Your Healthy Diet

Winter is not an excuse for eating less fresh fruits and vegetables. You still need to get plenty of vitamins to stay healthy. Here is the list of 7 best winter fruits you definitely should incorporate into your diet:winter fruits for healthy diet

  1. Oranges: great source of vitamin C and fiber.
  2. Pears: great source of fiber.
  3. Cranberries: helps with UTI, decrease cholesterol level and reduce the risk of coronary disease, diabetes, and inflammation.
  4. Pomegranates: great source of antioxidants, fiber, and potassium.
  5. Persimmons: great source of various vitamins and minerals, contains the high level of antioxidants and may reduce the risk of heart diseases.
  6. Clementines: have the same benefits as oranges.
  7. Grapefruit: contains vitamin A and C, the antioxidant lycopene, and fiber.

Eating Cottage Cheese Before Bed May Boost Your Metabolism

New research from Florida State University suggests that eating cottage cheese before going to bed may boost metabolism and strengthen the muscle and immune system due to the high content of protein.cottage cheese may boost your metabolism

For the study, a team of researchers checked the effect of eating cottage cheese before bed on 10 women aged between 20 and 30. Each woman ate 30g (1oz) of cottage cheese 30–60min before sleep.

Having analyzed the results of tests, the scientists concluded that women’s bodies were just as efficient after cottage cheese as when they were given a casein shake before bed.

The study author Professor Michael Ormsbee says: “Until now, we presumed whole foods would act similarly to the data on supplemental protein, but we had no real evidence. This is important because it adds to the body of literature that indicates whole foods work just as well as protein supplementation. And it gives people options for pre-sleep nutrition that go beyond powders and shaker bottles.”

Study Confirms that Microplastics Accumulate in Human Faeces

A new study from Austria finds evidence that microplastics, such as extremely small pieces of plastic beads, fibers, or fragments, accumulate in human feces.microplastics-accumulate-in-human-feces

A team of scientist from the Environment Agency Austria and the Medical University of Vienna has analyzed the samples of excrements of eight participants from Italy, Japan, Poland, the Netherlands, Russia, the United Kingdom, Finland, and Austria.

All participants reported what they ate or drank within the week prior to the sampling. They all drank from plastic bottles and ate plastic-wrapped foods. According to the study, the sea animals consume plastic, humans are likely to ingest it by eating tuna, shrimp, or lobster.

The scientists report that the microplastics may take part in transmittance of toxic chemicals and pathogens to the human body which can lead to the weakening of the immune response of the gut.

The 7 Signs Your Body Doesn’t Get Enough Protein

Nowadays, everyone knows what protein is but only a few of us know for sure how much of it we need to consume. According to government guidelines, average protein consumption should be 0.8g per kilogram of body weight. The next seven signs show you’re not getting enough protein, according to British nutritionists May Simpkin and Rick Hay:7 signs your body doesn't get enough protein

  1. You are craving salty and sweet food.
  2. Your muscles are saggy.
  3. You have issues with hair skin and nails.
  4. Your immune health is weak.
  5. It is hard for you to concentrate.
  6. It is hard for you to fall asleep.
  7. You are constantly stressed.

Dairy Fats May Decrease the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A new international study, led by researchers from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, confirms evidence that dairy fats may decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes.dairy fats cut the risk of diabetes

For the study, a team of the researchers analyzed the data received from 16 prospective cohorts that included 63,682 participants from 12 countries. Having analyzed the data, the researchers discovered that people who consumed more dairy products had the lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

The lead researcher Dr. Fumiaki Iamamura says: “We hope that our findings and existing evidence about dairy fat will help inform future dietary recommendations for the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases.”