Exotic Fruit Camu Camu May Help in Obesity Treatment

According to the research from the Université Laval’s Faculty of Medicine in Canada, an exotic fruit from the Amazon, called camu camu, might be useful in obesity treatment and metabolic disorders due to its positive influence on gut bacteria.camu camu helps in obesity treatment

For the study, the researchers fed mice a high-fat and high-sugar diet for 8 weeks. Half of the mice received the extract of camu camu every day. The results of the experiment showed that mice that consumed camu camu extract had 50% less weight compared to the mice who didn’t receive this extract.

Study co-author professor André Marette says: “All these changes were accompanied by a reshaping of the intestinal microbiota, including a blooming of Akkermansia muciniphila and a significant reduction in Lactobacillus bacteria.”

People with Obesity May Carry the Influenza Virus Longer

A new study, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, finds that people with obesity may carry the influenza A virus for longer periods of time compared to people with the normal weight. The study suggests that obesity affects the severity of flu symptoms, as well as the virus spreads.obese people carry influenza virus longer

For the study, a team of researchers collected and analyzed data on around 1783 people from Managua in Nicaragua during the three seasons of flu from 2015 till 2017. The results of the analysis showed that people with obesity who had flu shed the virus for 42% longer than people without the obesity.

Stacey Schultz-Cherry of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, US, comments on the public health implications of the study: “It is therefore even more important to develop effective strategies to prevent and control influenza, especially in the overweight and obese population,” she writes, “which could be challenging because of the poor vaccine responses in this population.”

Starting Meal with Yogurt Could Reduce Inflammation

A new study, conducted by the researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, US, suggests that starting your meal with a serving of yogurt may reduce inflammation, protect from the harmful byproducts of gut bacteria.yogurt may reduce inflammation

To examine their suggestion, the researchers recruited 120 premenopausal women, half of them were obese, for the first experiment. Half of the participants had to eat 12 ounces of low-fat yogurt each day for 9 weeks while others ate non-diary pudding. The results showed that some inflammatory markers, such as TNF-alpha, were significantly reduced in those participants who ate yogurt.

Ruisong Pei, a postdoctoral researcher, says: “Eating 8 ounces of low-fat yogurt before a meal is a feasible strategy to improve post-meal metabolism and thus may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases.”

Obesity Should Be Considered as Contagious Disease, Study

A new study, conducted by a pair of US economists, suggests that being in a social network with a higher level of obesity puts people at risk of increasing body mass index (BMI).obesity

The study was conducted on families living on military bases. The researchers found that exposure to communities with higher rates of obesity was associated with higher BMI in parents and children.

With the help of data from the Military Teenagers’ Environments, Exercise, and Nutrition Study, the scientists combined details on 1,111 young adolescents and more than 1,300 parents assigned to one of 12 military bases in the US.

The authors explain in their report: “While this study cannot definitively rule out the role of shared environments with the available measures, these findings suggest that other mechanisms may be at work.”

Green Peas and Broccoli May Ward Off Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

A new study, published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, suggests that including peas and broccoli in the daily diet could probably prevent obesity and metabolic syndrome.broccoli may prevent metabolic syndrome

Broccoli and peas contain a lot of essential vitamins and minerals that help the body to function properly.

For the study, the researchers used a mice model. The results of the study showed that the fermentable fiber inulin restored gut health and protected mice against metabolic syndrome induced by a high-fat diet.

Dr. Andrew Gewirtz, professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State, explains: “We found that manipulating dietary fiber content, particularly by adding fermentable fiber, guards against metabolic syndrome. This study revealed the specific mechanism used to restore gut health and suppress obesity and metabolic syndrome is the induction of IL-22 expression. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms that underlie diet-induced obesity and offer insight into how fermentable fibers might promote better health.”