Starting Meal with Yogurt Could Reduce Inflammation

A new study, conducted by the researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, US, suggests that starting your meal with a serving of yogurt may reduce inflammation, protect from the harmful byproducts of gut bacteria.yogurt may reduce inflammation

To examine their suggestion, the researchers recruited 120 premenopausal women, half of them were obese, for the first experiment. Half of the participants had to eat 12 ounces of low-fat yogurt each day for 9 weeks while others ate non-diary pudding. The results showed that some inflammatory markers, such as TNF-alpha, were significantly reduced in those participants who ate yogurt.

Ruisong Pei, a postdoctoral researcher, says: “Eating 8 ounces of low-fat yogurt before a meal is a feasible strategy to improve post-meal metabolism and thus may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases.”

Obesity Should Be Considered as Contagious Disease, Study

A new study, conducted by a pair of US economists, suggests that being in a social network with a higher level of obesity puts people at risk of increasing body mass index (BMI).obesity

The study was conducted on families living on military bases. The researchers found that exposure to communities with higher rates of obesity was associated with higher BMI in parents and children.

With the help of data from the Military Teenagers’ Environments, Exercise, and Nutrition Study, the scientists combined details on 1,111 young adolescents and more than 1,300 parents assigned to one of 12 military bases in the US.

The authors explain in their report: “While this study cannot definitively rule out the role of shared environments with the available measures, these findings suggest that other mechanisms may be at work.”

Green Peas and Broccoli May Ward Off Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

A new study, published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, suggests that including peas and broccoli in the daily diet could probably prevent obesity and metabolic syndrome.broccoli may prevent metabolic syndrome

Broccoli and peas contain a lot of essential vitamins and minerals that help the body to function properly.

For the study, the researchers used a mice model. The results of the study showed that the fermentable fiber inulin restored gut health and protected mice against metabolic syndrome induced by a high-fat diet.

Dr. Andrew Gewirtz, professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State, explains: “We found that manipulating dietary fiber content, particularly by adding fermentable fiber, guards against metabolic syndrome. This study revealed the specific mechanism used to restore gut health and suppress obesity and metabolic syndrome is the induction of IL-22 expression. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms that underlie diet-induced obesity and offer insight into how fermentable fibers might promote better health.”

Eating Walnuts Can Help Control Your Appetite

In a new study, researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical center showed that eating walnuts activated an area in the brain associated with regulating hunger and cravings.eating walnuts

For the study, a team of researchers utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to look how consuming the nut influence activity in the brain. Ten volunteers took part in the research.

Dr. Christos Mantzoros, M.D., D.Sc., Ph.D., director of the Human Nutrition Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, says: “From a strategic point of view, we now have a good tool to look into people’s brains—and we have a biological readout. We plan to use it to understand why people respond differently to food in the environment and, ultimately, to develop new medications to make it easier for people to keep their weight down.”

Swapping Just One Soda for Water a Day May Cut the Obesity Risk

A new study, conducted by the Spanish researchers, finds that drinking a glass of water in turn of one fizzy drink or beer may significantly lower the obesity risk.obesity risk

For the study, a team of researchers followed 15,765 healthy university graduates checking their consumption of common drinks, such as whole milk, reduced-fat milk, skimmed milk, milkshake, wine, beer, spirits, sugar-sweetened soda beverages, diet soda beverages, regular coffee, decaffeinated coffee, fresh orange juice, fresh non-orange juice, bottled juice, tap water and bottled water.

The research found that 873 participants that became obese with mathematical modeling showing drinking a glass of water instead of a fizzy drink or a beer a day the risk of obesity by 20%. Swapping a sugar-sweetened beverage with water was connected to the 15% lower risk of developing obesity.