Obesity Should Be Considered as Contagious Disease, Study

A new study, conducted by a pair of US economists, suggests that being in a social network with a higher level of obesity puts people at risk of increasing body mass index (BMI).obesity

The study was conducted on families living on military bases. The researchers found that exposure to communities with higher rates of obesity was associated with higher BMI in parents and children.

With the help of data from the Military Teenagers’ Environments, Exercise, and Nutrition Study, the scientists combined details on 1,111 young adolescents and more than 1,300 parents assigned to one of 12 military bases in the US.

The authors explain in their report: “While this study cannot definitively rule out the role of shared environments with the available measures, these findings suggest that other mechanisms may be at work.”

Green Peas and Broccoli May Ward Off Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

A new study, published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, suggests that including peas and broccoli in the daily diet could probably prevent obesity and metabolic syndrome.broccoli may prevent metabolic syndrome

Broccoli and peas contain a lot of essential vitamins and minerals that help the body to function properly.

For the study, the researchers used a mice model. The results of the study showed that the fermentable fiber inulin restored gut health and protected mice against metabolic syndrome induced by a high-fat diet.

Dr. Andrew Gewirtz, professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State, explains: “We found that manipulating dietary fiber content, particularly by adding fermentable fiber, guards against metabolic syndrome. This study revealed the specific mechanism used to restore gut health and suppress obesity and metabolic syndrome is the induction of IL-22 expression. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms that underlie diet-induced obesity and offer insight into how fermentable fibers might promote better health.”

Eating Walnuts Can Help Control Your Appetite

In a new study, researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical center showed that eating walnuts activated an area in the brain associated with regulating hunger and cravings.eating walnuts

For the study, a team of researchers utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to look how consuming the nut influence activity in the brain. Ten volunteers took part in the research.

Dr. Christos Mantzoros, M.D., D.Sc., Ph.D., director of the Human Nutrition Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, says: “From a strategic point of view, we now have a good tool to look into people’s brains—and we have a biological readout. We plan to use it to understand why people respond differently to food in the environment and, ultimately, to develop new medications to make it easier for people to keep their weight down.”

Drinking Coffee Could Help with Losing Weight and Exercise More

According to a new study by the team at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, drinking coffee can really help in combating obesity by burning calories due to its ability to release oxytocin, a hormone that affects both appetite and metabolism.losing weight

For the study, the researchers followed overweight mice who were given high amounts of caffeine. It helped them eat less and be more active on a wheel running machine.

Lead author of the study Prof. Guo Zhang says: “We found caffeine significantly reduced the food intakes and increased the wheel-running activities of diet-induced obese mice. Together, the results demonstrate caffeine treatment ameliorates obesity through both the reduction of food intake and the promotion of energy expenditure.”

Overweight People Are at Greater Risk of Dying from Heart Disease and Cancers

A new research suggests that adults who gain lots of weight and become overweight or obese increase their risk of dying from heart disease, cancer or other diseases.overweight people

For the study, the team of researchers tracked the weight history of more than 225,000 participants in three big studies, gauging the maximum body mass index (BMI) of every person an average of 16 years.

Andrew Stokes, an assistant professor of global health at the Boston University School of Public Health, explains: “We found that after considering weight history, the apparent paradoxical association between overweight/obesity and the risk of dying completely disappeared.”

The results of the study showed that morbidly obese people were twice as likely to die from any cause, more than 3 times as likely to die from heart disease, and 50% more likely to die from cancer compared to the people with the normal weight.