Eating Cod, Herring, and Red Snapper May Prevent Parkinson’s Disease

A new study, led by Professor Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede from the Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, suggests that eating cod, herring, and red snapper may help in preventing Parkinson’s disease.eating cod prevents parkinson's disease

The researchers also highlight that fish is normally a lot more nutritious at the end of summer because of increased metabolic activity.

One of the study researchers Nathalie Scheers says: “Levels of parvalbumin [a protein that prevents the formation of protein structures associated with the tremor disorder] are much higher in fish after they had a lot of sun, so it could be worthwhile increasing consumption during autumn.”

Other conditions linked to protein formation in the brain such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases may also benefit from higher fish consumption. The researchers plan to investigate the potential of parvalbumin in the future studies.

Eating Cod, Herring, and Red Snapper May Prevent Parkinson’s Disease

A new study, led by Professor Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede from the Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, suggests that eating cod, herring, and red snapper may help in preventing Parkinson’s disease.eating cod prevents parkinson's disease

The researchers also highlight that fish is normally a lot more nutritious at the end of summer because of increased metabolic activity.

One of the study researchers Nathalie Scheers says: “Levels of parvalbumin [a protein that prevents the formation of protein structures associated with the tremor disorder] are much higher in fish after they had a lot of sun, so it could be worthwhile increasing consumption during autumn.”

Other conditions linked to protein formation in the brain such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases may also benefit from higher fish consumption. The researchers plan to investigate the potential of parvalbumin in the future studies.

Eating Low-Fat Dairy Connected to the Higher Risk of Parkinson’s Disease

A new study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, US, finds that the risk of Parkinson’s disease was greater for people who are at least three servings of low-fat dairy daily, compared to those who consumed just one serving.low-fat dairy

The study included 80,736 women and 48,610 included into the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study correspondingly. Every 4 years, the participants completed a dietary questionnaire, and the scientists assessed the types of low-fat and full-fat dairy products that included milk, cream, cheese, butter, ice cream, and sherbet.

The researchers concluded that participants who consumed at least three servings of dairy every day had 34% greater risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

Dementia May Be Recognized in Painters by Their Brushstrokes

Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s illnesses influence a huge number of individuals in the United States each year. New research could soon enhance early recognition of these disorders, as researchers may have found an approach to foresee neurological conditions in painters.

A new research published in the journal Neuropsychology may have found a way to identify neurodegenerative disease in patients before they have been formally diagnosed.

Dementia is a typical neurological issue among elderly individuals in the U.S. Neurological disorders falling under the umbrella term “dementia” occur when nerve cells die or can no longer function properly, often resulting in memory loss and impaired reasoning.

Researchers led by psychologist Dr. Alex Forsythe – from the School of Psychology of the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom – analyzed 2,092 paintings by seven famous painters. The team collaborated with Dr. Tamsin Williams, of Tees, Esk, and Wear Valleys NHS Trust, and Dr. Ronan G. Reilly, from Maynooth University in Ireland.

Of the seven artists examined, two (Salvador Dali and Norval Morrisseau) had experienced Parkinson’s disease, while another two (James Brooks and Willem De Kooning) had Alzheimer’s disease.

Three of the artists – Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso, and Claude Monet – had undergone a normal aging process, with no recorded neurodegenerative diseases.

Continue reading at MedicalNewsToday.

Parkinson’s Disease May Be Treated by Regular Exercise

A new study confirms that regular exercise of any kind is a good medicine for people suffering from Parkinson’s disease. Although physical activity seems impossible for some Parkinson’s patients, it can provide a long-term influence, improving gait and reducing the risk of falls according to this research.regular exercise

This study measured the combined outcomes of more than 100 studies conducted during the last 30 years on the effect of the exercise in patients with Parkinson’s disease. It demonstrated that physical activity positively influences on patients, especially on their strength, flexibility and balance.

Dr Andrew Feigin, a neurologist at the Cushing Neuroscience Institute in Manhasset, N.Y., has some suggestions for choosing exercise. He believes that water aerobics or swimming is good because there is no risk of falling. He also recommends a treadmill if walking outside is too difficult.

More information here.