Just 10 Minutes of Light Physical Activity May Boost Memory

A new study, performed by an international team of researchers from the University of California, Irvine, USA, and the University of Tsukuba, Japan, suggests that only 10 minutes of light physical activity may boost your memory.10 minuts of light physical activity boost memory

To check their hypothesis, the researchers asked 36 healthy adult participants to carry out only 10 minutes of light exercise. After that, the scientists used high-resolution functional MRI to measure changes in brain activity.

Michael Yassa, a project co-leader, says: “What we observed is that these 10-minute periods of exercise showed results immediately afterward.” Yassa and his team are planning to continue investigating. Next, they are going to run longer-term studies in older adults who have the higher risk of cognitive decline.

Regular Walking May Reduce Stroke Severity

A new study, conducted by the scientists from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, finds that light and moderate physical activity, for example walking and swimming, may help reduce the stroke severity.walking reduce stroke severity

The study included approximately data from 1,000 individuals who had had a stroke. Having performed the given data, the researchers concluded that those who had been doing several hours of light or moderate physical exercises had less severe strokes compared to those who hadn’t been performing any exercises.

Katharina S. Sunnerhagen, the author of the study, says: “There is a growing body of evidence that physical activity may have a protective effect on the brain and our research adds to that evidence.”

Intensive Physical Activity Associated with Higher Risk of ALS

A new research, conducted by the team of neurologists from the Netherlands, finds that intensive physical activity may lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.intensive physical activity linked to ALS

To assess the connection between physical activity and ALS, a team of scientists investigated the lifestyles of more than 1,500 adults with the diagnosis of ALS in Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands. These data contained information on their lifetime physical activity levels, their gender, educational attainment, employment history, and smoking and alcohol intake.

According to the received data, the average heightened risk for physical activity in leisure time was 7%, and 6% for occupational physical activity.

The team says the overall risk can be as high as a 26% increase in risk when comparing a person who is more active than average with one who is significantly less active than average.

Physical Activity May Change Men’s Food Preferences, but not Women’s

A new research from the University of Missouri in Columbia finds that physical activity may alter men’s food preferences. However, the food preferences of women are likely to remain the same, study says.food preferences

For the study, a team of researchers studied male and female rats splitting them into two mixed-sex groups. The first group had access to a running wheel (the exercise group), the second group did not (sedentary group). Both groups had access to various types of diets.

In the end of the experiment, the scientists noted that exercising female rats continued to choose high-fat diet over other two diets, and exercising male rats reduces their intake of the high-fat diet and increased their intake of the high-sucrose and high-cornstarch diets.

The team concludes: “The significant sex differences in response to physical activity observed through both behavioral and physiological measures suggest potential motivational or metabolic difference between males and females.”

Moderate Physical Activity Associated with the Healthier Brain

A new study from the University of Wisconsin-Medison finds that moderate physical activity may lead to healthier brain functions in people at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.Moderate Physical Activity Associated with the Healthier Brain

In the course of the study, the scientists discovered that those participants who spent more than an hour per day taking part in moderate physical exercise demonstrated higher and healthier levels of glucose metabolism, the process giving brain cells the right amount of fuel, compared to those participants who did not exercise.

Ryan Dougherty, one of the researchers, says: “This study has implications for guiding exercise ‘prescriptions’ that could help protect the brain from Alzheimer’s disease. While many people become discouraged about Alzheimer’s disease because they feel there’s little they can do to protect against it, these results suggest that engaging in moderate physical activity may slow down the progression of the disease.”