A Better-Quality Sleep Connected to Lower Susceptibility to PTSD

A new research suggests that better-quality sleep is associated with reduced activity in brain regions responsible for fear learning. This means that time spent in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep can indicate the susceptibility to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).susceptibility

A team of researchers from Rutgers University in Newark, USA, asked the 17 participants, 12 male, and 5 female, to monitor their brain activity during sleep for about one week. The researchers found that those participants who spent more time in the REM phase of sleep also had dampened activity in the amygdala, the hippocampus, and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex during fear learning.

The researchers conclude in their paper: “Ultimately, our results may suggest that baseline REM sleep could serve as a non-invasive biomarker for resilience, or susceptibility, to trauma.”

Sleep Can Help People to Cope with a Traumatic Event

A new study from Switzerland suggests that sleeping soon after a traumatic event can help people cope with it.traumatic event

For the study, two groups of participants watched a video with traumatic images. One group slept for the night after watching it, and another group stayed awake. Participants from both groups recorded their memories during several days after watching video.

Birgit Kleim, a study author and a clinical psychological scientist in the department of psychiatry, psychotherapy and psychosomatics at the University of Zurich, says: “Our results reveal that people who slept after the film had fewer and less distressing recurring emotional memories than those who were awake.”

More information about the study is here.