Religion Is a Buffer against Suicide for Women

According to a recent study, women who attend religious services on a regular basis may have a lower risk of suicide compared to those who don’t.suicide

U.S. researchers reviewed data on about 90,000 women that were enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study from 1996 to 2010. 36 suicides happened during this time.

The study found that nearly 19% of women in the study attended religious services more than once a week; about 41% attended once a week; around 16% attended services less than once a week, and nearly 24% never attended religious services.

According to the study, women who attended religious services at least once a week had 5 times lower risk of suicide that those who never attended services. Nevertheless, the study shows only an association and not a cause-and-effect relationship.

More details here.

Religious Services May Help People Live Longer

A recent study suggests that women who often attend religious services are at lower risk of death from various causes, including the risk of death from such diseases as heart disease and cancer.religious-services

However, the research doesn’t prove a cause-effect relationship between attending religious services and longer life, but researchers claim that the association appears to be strong.

A team of researchers pulled data from the national health study of female nurses to examine attendance at religious services and posterior death in women.

The data analysis showed that those women who attended religious services more than one time a week had a 33% lower risk of death compared to those who have never attended religious services. Also, the study results showed that attending religious services more than one time a week connected to a 27% lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease and a 21% lower risk of death from cancer.

“I think it’s not just one thing, but a combination of factors,” Tylor J. VanderWeele, study author, Ph.D., of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public, said. “Some of it is that if you attend services you develop a community and you, therefore, have social support, which is beneficial both psychologically and materially for health. Also, by attending services there are certain social norms that make things like smoking less likely, which is prospective for health.”

More information here.