Incoherent and Non-specific Speech Can Be the First Sign of Mental Decline

According to a new study, a rambling and non-specific speech might be the early sign of the coming mental decline – Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Researchers managed to find evidence that people with mild cognitive impairment are more likely to use more words than necessary and they usually need more time to find the right words compared to their healthy counterparts.mental decline

For the study, the researchers compared the language abilities of 22 healthy young persons, 24 senior persons, and 22 people with MCI. Patients with MCI gave long and redundant with their answers to simple questions.

Lead researcher Janet Cohen Sherman from Massachusetts General Hospital explains: “They were much less concise in conveying information, the sentences they produced were much longer, they had a hard time staying on point and I guess you could say they were much more roundabout in getting their point across.”

Sedentary Lifestyle Connected to “Older” Cells in Senior Women

A new study investigated the impact of a sedentary lifestyle on the biological age of senior women.sedentary lifestyle

Modern science associates the telomere length with ageing and disease. With age, telomeres become shorter until the cells die or transform into oncogenic cells. Short telomeres are connected to cancer, heart diseases, and diabetes.

The team of researchers at the University of California-San Diego, led by Aladdin Shadyab, Ph.D., from the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at UCSD School of Medicine, examined the effects of a sedentary lifestyle on the age of cells in senior women.

According to the findings of the study, women who exercised for under 40 minutes and spent sitting more than 10 hours per day had biologically older cells compared to women who had been sitting less and exercised more. As the scientists note, low physical activity seemed to account for an eight-year biological age gap between those who exercised and those who did not.

More information about the study you can find here.

Mediterranean Diet Can Prevent Brain Atrophy

A new study, published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, suggests that traditional Mediterranean diet can help prevent brain atrophy in senior adults.Mediterranean diet can prevent brain atrophy

This research didn’t find a relation between fish and meat consumption. It suggests that other components of the diet, or a combination of them, can be responsible for this association.

Michelle Luciano, PhD, one of the researchers, says: “In our study, eating habits were measured before brain volume was which suggests that the diet may be able to provide long-term protection to the brain. Still, larger studies are needed to confirm these results.”

More information about the study you can find here.

Parkinson’s Disease May Be Treated by Regular Exercise

A new study confirms that regular exercise of any kind is a good medicine for people suffering from Parkinson’s disease. Although physical activity seems impossible for some Parkinson’s patients, it can provide a long-term influence, improving gait and reducing the risk of falls according to this research.regular exercise

This study measured the combined outcomes of more than 100 studies conducted during the last 30 years on the effect of the exercise in patients with Parkinson’s disease. It demonstrated that physical activity positively influences on patients, especially on their strength, flexibility and balance.

Dr Andrew Feigin, a neurologist at the Cushing Neuroscience Institute in Manhasset, N.Y., has some suggestions for choosing exercise. He believes that water aerobics or swimming is good because there is no risk of falling. He also recommends a treadmill if walking outside is too difficult.

More information here.

Mediterranean Diet and Coffee May Protect from Age-Related Eye Disease

A recent research finds that eating a Mediterranean diet and drinking coffee may lower the risk of developing age-related eye disease (age-related macular degeneration, or AMD), one of the leading causes of blindness.age-related eye disease

In the study, 883 people aged 55 and older participated in the study. The researchers assessed their diets with the help of questionnaires. 449 people had early stage of AMD and 434 didn’t have eye disease. Following Mediterranean diet was associated with a 35% lower risk of AMD.

Also, the researchers found that people who consumed high level of caffeine seemed to have a lower risk of AMD. Among those who consumed high levels of caffeine (around 78mg of coffee per day, or one shot of espresso), 54% did not have AMD and 45% had the disease.

More information here.