Diabetes Drug May Reduce the Risk of Age-Related Degeneration

A new study from the University of Florida suggests that diabetes drug Metformin may reduce the risk of developing age-related degeneration (AMD).diabetes drug reduces risk of age-related degeneration

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed medical records from 1947 patients from the University of Florida health clinic. They were older than 55 years and matched every AMD case. Also, 5841 patients were included as controls.

The authors of the study conclude in their paper: “We found that metformin, but not other medications, was associated with decreased odds of developing AMD. These findings suggest that metformin itself, and not other medications, has an important protective role.”

Sleep Apnea Connected to the Higher Risk of Dementia

A recent research, published in the European Respiratory Journal, finds that sleep apnea, a common disorder that interferes with the breathing while sleeping, is connected to the changes in brain structure similar to changes seen in early dementia.sleep apnea increases the risk of dementia

For the study, 83 participants were involved with the age from 51 to 88. They reported memory and mood problems to their doctors. None of them was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) They underwent memory tests and MRI brain scans.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists concluded that a low level of oxygen in blood during sleep was associated with the loss of thickness of the right and left temporal lobes of the brain. These brain structures play important role in memory processes and proved to be changed in dementia.

More information about Sleep Apnea and its symptoms you may find here.

Eating Cod, Herring, and Red Snapper May Prevent Parkinson’s Disease

A new study, led by Professor Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede from the Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, suggests that eating cod, herring, and red snapper may help in preventing Parkinson’s disease.eating cod prevents parkinson's disease

The researchers also highlight that fish is normally a lot more nutritious at the end of summer because of increased metabolic activity.

One of the study researchers Nathalie Scheers says: “Levels of parvalbumin [a protein that prevents the formation of protein structures associated with the tremor disorder] are much higher in fish after they had a lot of sun, so it could be worthwhile increasing consumption during autumn.”

Other conditions linked to protein formation in the brain such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases may also benefit from higher fish consumption. The researchers plan to investigate the potential of parvalbumin in the future studies.

Blood Test to Detect Alzheimer’s Disease before Symptoms Appear

A group of researchers claims that they are close to developing a blood test that will be able to detect the Alzheimer’s disease long before the symptoms appear.blood test

One of the main problems in treating the Alzheimer’s disease is that it is always diagnosed at a relatively late stage as the symptoms may develop over the many years.

In a recent study, published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine, researchers wanted to understand whether measuring the relative levels of healthy and pathological amyloid-beta in the blood could identify Alzheimer’s disease at its early stages.

The initial phase of the study demonstrated promising results – in participants who showed subtle early symptoms of the Alzheimer’s disease, the test detected changes in levels of amyloid-beta that associated with abnormal deposits visualized using brain scans.

Walking at Least 4,000 Steps a Day May Boost Cognitive Function

A new study from the University of California, Los Angeles, suggests that short walks every day can help to keep the brain healthy, supporting the overall resilience of cognitive function.cognitive function

For the study, a team of scientists selected 26 adults aged 60 and over. The participants were divided into two groups, the first was with low physical activity where people walked 4,000 or fewer steps; the second group was with high physical activity, where people walked more than 4,000 steps per day.

The researchers discovered that people who walked more than 4,000 steps (approximately 3 km) every day had thicker hippocampi and thicker associated brain regions compared to people from the low physical activity.

All original content on these pages is fingerprinted and certified by Digiprove