Popular Blood Pressure Drug Increases Risk of Skin Cancer

A new Danish research finds that one of the most popular blood pressure drug used around the globe to treat hypertension can increase the risk of developing skin cancer by seven times.blood pressure drug

A team of scientists, led by Anton Pottegard, associate professor of clinical pharmacology at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense, examined the association between the common drug hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer.

Having analyzed the data of over 80,000 patients, the researchers found that those who took HTCS had 7 times higher chances to develop skin cancer.

Anton Pottergard comments: “We knew that hydrochlorothiazide made the skin more vulnerable to damage from the sun’s UV rays, but what is new and also surprising is that long-term use of this blood pressure medicine leads to such significant increase in the risk of skin cancer.”

7 Symptoms of Skin Cancer You Might Not See Outside of the Body

In most cases, 99 out of 100, skin cancer can be seen clearly outside of the body in the form of a funky mole, rash, blemish, or lesion). However, there are some exceptions. Here are 7 symptoms of skin cancer that happen in 1% cases of 100:skin cancer

  1. Lumps beneath the skin, especially in groin, armpit, or neck.
  2. Abdominal pain.
  3. Problems with breathing.
  4. Arthritis-like pain in joints.
  5. Blurry or impaired vision.
  6. Diarrhea, constipation, or cramps.
  7. Headaches, seizures, or cognitive problems.

A Compound in Broccoli Can Kill Deadly Melanoma Cells

An international team of researchers, led by Penn State College of Medicine, US, developed a compound similar to one found in broccoli and cauliflower and other vegetables of cabbage group able to kill tumors in melanoma.broccoli can kill melanoma cells

Researchers suggest that this compound can block the hypoxia-inducible factor protein helping tumors grow. In order to improve effectiveness, the scientists modified the drug by replacing the sulfur in a compound they tested before with selenium. They also varied the length of the chemical chain.

Dr. Arun Sharma says: “There are a lot of recommendations that, for example, broccoli can reduce your chances of getting cancer. Those are OK recommendations for prevention, but the compounds in the vegetables alone may not be potent enough to be used in a therapeutic environment.”