27 Health Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

Except for some rare personal cases, most adults need to sleep from 7 to 9 hours, according to health experts. Sleep deprivation can make harm to your physical and mental health. Here what happens to you if you don’t get enough sleep:sleep deprivation leads to health problems

  1. Higher risk for colon and breast cancers.
  2. Faster skin aging.
  3. Weight gain.
  4. You keen to feeling lonely.
  5. Problems with memorizing new things.
  6. Damage of long-term memory.
  7. Higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
  8. Higher risk of cardiovascular disease.
  9. You feel more irritated.
  10. Vision problems such as tunnel and double vision, hallucinations.
  11. You get clumsier.
  12. Immunity works worse.
  13. Sleep deprivation decreases sexual drive and desire in men and women.
  14. Sleepy people are more stressed.
  15. Higher risk of type 2 diabetes.
  16. Tiredness leads to bad decisions.
  17. You become easily distracted.
  18. It is hard for you to speak normally.
  19. Higher risk of a car accident.
  20. Tiredness linked to urine overproduction.
  21. Lack of sleep leads to muscle atrophy.
  22. Sensitivity to pain increases.
  23. Gastrointestinal issues appear.
  24. Higher risk of a headache.
  25. More inflammation.
  26. Serious health problems due to snoring or sleep apnea.
  27. Higher risk of early death.

A Single Night of Bad Sleep May Increase Proteins of Alzheimer’s Disease

New research, executed by the scientists from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, found that people who experienced just one night of bad sleep also known as sleep deprivation showed an immediate increase in levels of beta-amyloid, a protein that can form “plaques” that play a key role in Alzheimer’s disease.bad sleep increases risk of Alzheimer's disease

For the study, the researchers studied 20 healthy adults aged between 22 and 72. After just one night of sleep deprivation, the scientists noticed that beta-amyloid levels have increased in the right hippocampus and thalamus of the subjects’ brains.

Authors conclude in their study: “Our results highlight the relevance of good sleep hygiene for proper brain function and as a potential target for prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.”