Obstructive Sleep Apnea Affects a Person’s Ability to Form Memories

obstructive sleep apnea

Recent research finds that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may affect a person’s ability to form memories about life. Researchers believe that this dysfunction can be a sign of depression.

For the study, a team of researchers examined 44 adults with OSA who were not treating the condition, and 44 healthy adults without OSA. The researchers analyzed their abilities to recall different memories from childhood, early adult lives, and recent events.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists found that more than 52% of the participants with the condition had overgeneral memories compared to less than 19% of healthy participants with overgeneral memories.

Dr. Jackson, a senior research fellow at RMIT’s School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, comments: “Our study suggests sleep apnea may impair the brain’s capacity to either encode or consolidate certain types of life memories, which makes it hard for people to recall details from the past. Brain scans of people with sleep apnoea show they have a significant loss of grey matter from regions that overlap with the autobiographical memory network.”

Study: Insufficient Sleep Can Be the Cause of Dehydration

According to a new study, insufficient sleep is associated with dehydration due to the disrupted release of a hormone responsible for hydration regulation.insufficient sleep causes dehydration

For their research, a team of researchers analyzed the data from over 20,000 records of healthy young adults who participated in two big studies, the National Health and Nutrition Survey and the Chinese Kailuan Study.

The scientists concluded that people who slept for 6 hours or less on a regular basis were 16-59% more likely to experience dehydration than people who slept for at least 8 hours every night.

Asher Rosinger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of biobehavioral health at Pennsylvania State University in State College, explains: “This study suggests that if you’re not getting enough sleep and you feel bad or tired the next day, drink extra water.”

Excessive Sleeping May Be a Deadly Warning Sign

A new research, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, suggests that excessive sleeping could be connected to a higher risk of heart problems and higher mortality risk.excessive sleeping

For the study, a team of researchers has analyzed 74 previous studies that included self-reported sleep duration and its quality. They also examined the mortality and cardiovascular health. The studies comprised more than 3 million participants in total.

Chun Shing Kwok, one of the researchers of the study says: “Our findings have important implications as clinicians should have greater consideration for exploring sleep duration and quality during consultations.”

Fish in Children’s Menu Weekly May Improve Sleep and Intelligence

A recent study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, finds that children aged between 9 and 11 years who ate fish at least once a week had higher IQ scores and better sleep qualify than children who ate fish seldom.fish

For the study, a team of researchers assessed the fish consumption of 541 children from China aged 9–11. They used a dietary questionnaire to find out how much fish they consumed during the previous month.

Study co-author Prof. Adrian Raine, of the School of Arts and Sciences at Penn State’s Perelman School of Medicine, explains: “Lack of sleep is associated with antisocial behavior; poor cognition is associated with antisocial behavior. We have found that omega-3 supplements reduce antisocial behavior, so it’s not too surprising that fish is behind this.”

Sleep Deprivation Affects the Brain as Much as Alcohol

A new research finds that sleep deprivation can disrupt abilities of the brain cells to communicate with each other, similar to the effect of drinking too much alcohol. Eventually, this may lead to temporary mental lapses that may affect memory and visual perception.sleep deprivation

For the purposes of the study, a team of scientists studied 12 persons preparing to undergo surgery for epilepsy at UCLA. The participants had electrodes implanted in their brains. As lack of sleep can provoke seizures, the patients didn’t sleep all night. After this, the patients were asked to categorize the variety of images as fast as possible.

Having analyzed the results from the patients, the researchers concluded that task completion grew more challenging the longer patients were awake. Moreover, the more patients grew sleepier the slower their brain cells were.

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