Fish in Children’s Menu Weekly May Improve Sleep and Intelligence

A recent study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, finds that children aged between 9 and 11 years who ate fish at least once a week had higher IQ scores and better sleep qualify than children who ate fish

For the study, a team of researchers assessed the fish consumption of 541 children from China aged 9–11. They used a dietary questionnaire to find out how much fish they consumed during the previous month.

Study co-author Prof. Adrian Raine, of the School of Arts and Sciences at Penn State’s Perelman School of Medicine, explains: “Lack of sleep is associated with antisocial behavior; poor cognition is associated with antisocial behavior. We have found that omega-3 supplements reduce antisocial behavior, so it’s not too surprising that fish is behind this.”

Sleep Deprivation Affects the Brain as Much as Alcohol

A new research finds that sleep deprivation can disrupt abilities of the brain cells to communicate with each other, similar to the effect of drinking too much alcohol. Eventually, this may lead to temporary mental lapses that may affect memory and visual perception.sleep deprivation

For the purposes of the study, a team of scientists studied 12 persons preparing to undergo surgery for epilepsy at UCLA. The participants had electrodes implanted in their brains. As lack of sleep can provoke seizures, the patients didn’t sleep all night. After this, the patients were asked to categorize the variety of images as fast as possible.

Having analyzed the results from the patients, the researchers concluded that task completion grew more challenging the longer patients were awake. Moreover, the more patients grew sleepier the slower their brain cells were.

A Better-Quality Sleep Connected to Lower Susceptibility to PTSD

A new research suggests that better-quality sleep is associated with reduced activity in brain regions responsible for fear learning. This means that time spent in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep can indicate the susceptibility to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).susceptibility

A team of researchers from Rutgers University in Newark, USA, asked the 17 participants, 12 male, and 5 female, to monitor their brain activity during sleep for about one week. The researchers found that those participants who spent more time in the REM phase of sleep also had dampened activity in the amygdala, the hippocampus, and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex during fear learning.

The researchers conclude in their paper: “Ultimately, our results may suggest that baseline REM sleep could serve as a non-invasive biomarker for resilience, or susceptibility, to trauma.”

7 Reasons Why You Could Have Dreams that Whack You Out

Some people dream every night, others have dreams from time to time but both categories sometimes have dreams that may completely whack us out. And here are 7 possible reasons for such kind of dreams:dreams

  1. You ate spicy food before going to bed.
  2. You are taking melatonin supplements.
  3. You watched television before bed.
  4. You’ve recently stopped taking medication.
  5. You suffer from sleep apnea.
  6. You did not sleep well enough the night before.
  7. You are under stress and anxiety for the whole day.

Trouble Sleeping Can Be not a Disorder but a Relic of Evolutionary Past

Age-related differences in sleep patterns can guarantee that at least one person is awake at night in case of danger, according to the findings of a new study of modern hunter-gatherers in northern Tanzania still living in groups.trouble sleeping

The hunter-gatherers in the study live and sleep in groups of 20 to 30 people and follow day and night cycles as humans did for hundreds of thousands years before the development of agriculture.

Study co-author Charlie Nunn, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke University, says: “A lot of older people go to doctors complaining that they wake up early and can’t get back to sleep. But maybe there’s nothing wrong with them. Maybe some of the medical issues we have today could be explained not as disorders, but as a relic of an evolutionary past in which they were beneficial.”