Neuroscientists Identified Anxiety Cells in Mouse Brain

A new research from neuroscientists at UC San Francisco and the Columbia University Irving Medical Center suggests that feeling of anxiety might be connected to the newly identified anxiety cell in the brain. The study was published in Neuron.anxiety cells

The researchers discovered this type of cells in the hippocampus in the brains of mice. The authors of the study believe that these cells also exist in human brains.

One of the senior investigators Rene Hen, Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry at CUIMC, explains: “We call these anxiety cells because they only fire when the animals are in places that are innately frightening to them. For a mouse, that’s an open area where they’re more exposed to predators, or an elevated platform.”

Exercising in Groups Is Better for Your Mental Health Than Solo Workouts

A new study from the University of England finds that exercising in groups reduces stress levels and improves quality of life significantly more than solo workouts.class fitness is better than solo workouts

In the course of the study, the researchers discovered that exercising in a group may reduce stress by 26% in some people compared to those who prefer exercising alone.

Dr. Dayna Yorks of the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine says: “The communal benefits of coming together with friends and colleagues and doing something difficult, while encouraging one another, pays dividends beyond exercising alone. The findings support the concept of a mental, physical and emotional approach to health that is necessary for student doctors and physicians.”

Stress May Be as Harmful for Women’s Health as Junk Food

Researchers from Brigham Young University in Provo, US, found that stress may be as harmful to our health as junk food, at least for women.stress bad as junk food

For the study, the researchers completed an analysis of fecal samples taken from the mice before and after stress exposure to determine how their gut microbiota had been affected by diet and stress. The team found that female mice demonstrated gut microbiota changes in response to stress that was similar in response to the high-fat diet. Those changes were not found in male mice.

Study co-author Laura Bridgewater from the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology at Brigham Young University, explains: “In society, women tend to have higher rates of depression and anxiety, which are linked to stress. This study suggests that a possible source of the gender discrepancy may be the different way gut microbiota responds to stress in males vs. females.”

People Who Cycle to Work Feel Less Stressed, Study

A new study from Concordia University in Canada suggests that people who cycled to work reported feeling less stressed compared to people who went to work by car.people cycling to work feel less stressed

For the study, the researchers used a web-based survey to collect information from 123 adults who worked at an organization Autodesk, a software company in Ontario, Canada. Having analyzed the collected data, the researchers came to the conclusion that employees who cycled to work reported much lower stress levels within 45 minutes of arrival compared to those who traveled to work by car.

Lead study author Stephane Brutus of the John Molson School of Business at Concordia says: “With growing concerns about traffic congestion and pollution, governments are increasingly promoting non-motorized alternative modes of transport, such as walking and cycling. I can only hope that further studies will follow our lead and develop more precise and deliberate research into this phenomenon.”

Yoga and Meditation Can Alternate Gene Expression Changes Causing Stress

A new study finds that mind-body interventions, such as yoga and meditation, can reverse gene expression changes causing stress.yoga alternates gene expression

For the study, a team of researchers reviews 18 studies with 846 participants concerning effects of numerous mind-body practices, such as yoga, Tai Chi, meditation, and mindfulness, on gene expression.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists discovered that people practicing mind-body practices have the reduced production of a molecule called nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB), which regulated gene expression.

Study leader Ivana Buric of the Centre for Psychology at Coventry University in the United Kingdom says: “Millions of people around the world already enjoy the health benefits of mind-body interventions like yoga or meditation, but what they perhaps don’t realize is that these benefits begin at a molecular level and can change the way our genetic code goes about its business.”