Low Levels of Bad Cholesterol May Increase the Risk of Stroke

A new study from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston suggests that the low levels of ‘bad cholesterol’, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, may increase the risk of bleeding stroke in women.bad cholesterol level

For the study, the researchers examined data of 27,937 women aged 45 years and older who participated in the Women’s Health Study. The data analysis showed that women with the lowest levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were 2.2 times as likely to have a bleeding stroke as women with higher LDL cholesterol level.

Study author Pamela Rist says: “Women with very low LDL cholesterol or low triglycerides should be monitored by their doctors for other stroke risk factors that can be modified, like high blood pressure and smoking, in order to reduce their risk of hemorrhagic stroke.”

Even Moderate Alcohol Consumption Promotes the Risk of Stroke

A large cohort study that included a Chinese population finds that moderate alcohol consumption increases the risk of stroke. The findings were published in the journal The Lancet.moderate alcohol consumption linked to stroke

Scientists from Oxford University, in the United Kingdom, and Peking University, the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and the Peking Union Medical College, in Beijing, China assessed data from 512,715 adults from China who enrolled in the China Kadorie Biobank initiative.

The researchers checked whether the participants had the rs671 or rs1229984 genetic variants responsible for lower alcohol intake and examined their drinking habits that were followed for 10 years.

Having analyzed the information from the male population, the researchers discovered that people with these two genetic variants also had a lower risk of high blood pressure and stroke.

Higher Levels of Iron Increase the Risk of Certain Strokes

A new study by scientists from Imperial College London finds that people with higher levels of iron are at greater risk of having a stroke, especially the kind of stroke that results from a blood clot or ohigher levels of iron increase the risk of strokether obstacle traveling from the heart.

For the study, the researchers used genetic information on over 48,000 people from public sources. With the help of technique Mendelian randomization, the researchers identified three “single-letter alterations,” or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in their DNA that can raise or reduce the iron status of the individual.

Lead study author Dr. Dipender Gill says: “All these findings highlight potential treatments or lifestyle interventions that may help reduce stroke risk, and that they may offer avenues for further study.”

Regular Walking May Reduce Stroke Severity

A new study, conducted by the scientists from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, finds that light and moderate physical activity, for example walking and swimming, may help reduce the stroke severity.walking reduce stroke severity

The study included approximately data from 1,000 individuals who had had a stroke. Having performed the given data, the researchers concluded that those who had been doing several hours of light or moderate physical exercises had less severe strokes compared to those who hadn’t been performing any exercises.

Katharina S. Sunnerhagen, the author of the study, says: “There is a growing body of evidence that physical activity may have a protective effect on the brain and our research adds to that evidence.”

Three Servings of Dairy a Day May Cut the Risk of Heart Disease

New research, conducted by a team of scientists from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, finds that people who consume three servings of dairy, including milk, cheese, butter, or cream, a day are almost two times less likely to suffer from heart disease and strokes than people who consume less dairy.dairy cuts the risk of heart disease

For their study, the researchers analyzed the data from more than 136,000 people from 21 countries aged between 35 and 70 who had taken part in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study. The study focused on environmental, societal, and biological effects on obesity and chronic health issues.

Dr. Mahshid Meghan, a senior research associate at McMaster University, explains: “What I really want to emphasize is that consumption shouldn’t be discouraged but encouraged especially in low-income countries and even in high-income countries where consumption is low. We are not saying people eating seven servings of dairy a day should increase their intake, but that three servings – moderation – is good for you.’

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