These 15 Vegetables Are Real Superfoods, Approved by Science

At this point, we’ve read and heard about dozens of so-called superfoods that are believed to be super healthy and super good for your body and health. But most of such foods hiding behind such name aren’t that good for you. Here is the ultimate list of 15 real superfoods, proven to be healthy and nourishing by various studies across the world, you should include in your diet:vegetables that are real superfoods

  1. Cabbage is very low in calories and a great source of calcium, iron, fiber, folate, and vitamins.
  2. Cauliflower is rich in fiber and folate, vitamins B6, C, K, and potassium.
  3. Kohlrabi is high in vitamins C, B6, and potassium.
  4. Scallions are low in calories and a great source of vitamins A and C.
  5. Brussels sprouts are high in fiber, folate, vitamins A, C, K, and B6, iron, and potassium. They also reduce the risk of certain cancers.
  6. Pumpkin is rich in beta-carotene, potassium, fibre, vitamins B6, C, E, and iron.
  7. Broccoli is high in vitamin C and folate.
  8. Zesty arugula is a good source of zinc, calcium, and iron.
  9. Bell peppers provide 100% of the daily allowance of vitamin A and 300% of the daily allowance of vitamin C.
  10. Collard greens contain vitamins from A to Z.
  11. A cup of raw kale provides you with more than 200% of the daily allowance of vitamin A and 684% of allowance of vitamin K.
  12. Chives are rich in fiber and vitamins A, B6, C, and K.
  13. Lettuce packs vitamins A, B6, C, and K.
  14. Swiss chard is rich in iron and magnesium, as well as vitamins A, B6, C, E, K, calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium.
  15. Watercress reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Scientists Proved Why Broccoli Is Really a Superfood

According to a recent study, broccoli can lower the risk of coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and even several types of cancer. Flavonoids found in this food can help the body to response to diseases, scientists suggest.broccoli

Eating broccoli once per three days can improve the immune system by aiding inflammation.

“Phenolic compounds have good antioxidant activity, and there is increasing evidence that this activity affects biochemical pathways affiliated with inflammation in mammals,” says Dr. Jack Juvik, a geneticist from the University of Illinois. “We need inflammation because it’s a response to the disease or damage, but it’s also associated with initiation of a number of diseases. People whose diets consist of a certain level of these compounds will have a lesser risk of contracting these diseases.”

More information here.