Modern Teens Are Less Engaged in Sex, Driving, Drinking, and Dating Activities

According to a study, published in the journal Child Development, the percentage of teens in the US who have a driver license, who have tried alcohol, who date and who work for pay has significantly reduced since 1976.teens

Though more than half of teens still engaged in these activities, but the study says that the majorities reduced considerably. For example, between 1976 and 1979, 86% of high school students had gone on date, and between 2010 and 2015 only 63% of students had. During the same period that amount who had ever earned money dropped from 76 to 55%, and the amount of those who had tried alcohol decreased from 93% to 67%.

Jean Twenge, lead author of the study, says: “People say, ‘Oh, it’s because teenagers are more responsible, or lazier, or more boring,’ but they’re missing the larger trend. Rather kids may be less interested in activities such as dating, driving or getting jobs because in today’s society, they no longer need to.”

Electronic Cigarettes May Double the Risk of Bronchitis in Teenagers

A team of researchers from the University of Southern California finds that teenage users of e-cigarettes are twice more likely to get bronchitis compared to children who have never smoked electronic cigarettes.bronchitis

For their study, the scientists analyzed the responses from more than 2,000 older teenagers, asking for symptoms of chronic bronchitis such as a daily cough for three months straight.

Researchers found that those teenagers who vape had 71% higher risk of the condition which was connected to the risk of damaging lungs.

Dr Rob McConnell, a professor of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine, within the University of Southern California, says: “E-cigarettes are known to deliver chemicals toxic to the lungs, including oxidant metals, glycerol vapour, diketone flavouring compounds and nicotine. However, there has been little study of the chronic health effects of e-cigarettes.”

More information here.

Overweight Young Men May Have the Risk of Liver Disease Later

Excess weight at the age from 18 to 20 may be a signal that a man may have the risk of liver disease decades later, a large long-term study from Sweden suggests.liver disease

In their study, researchers followed more than 44,000 men conscripted for military service in 1969 and 1970 and discovered that those who were overweight as young men were 64% more likely to have serious problems with liver and liver-related deaths in the next 40 years compared to their counterparts with a healthy weight.

“Most likely, these teens already had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) at the start of the study, or developed it down the road,” says the lead author, Dr. Hannes Hagstrom of the Center for Digestive Diseases at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. “We know that some persons with NAFLD do develop severe liver disease.”

More details here.

Vitamin Deficiency Connected to Migraine in Young People

A recent study, performed by the team of researchers from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, suggests that a number of youngsters suffer from migraines due to the vitamin deficiency. Still, authors note further studies are needed to know whether vitamin supplementation will be effective in the treatment of the headache disorder.vitamin deficiency

For this study, the researchers examined migraine patients who were kids, teens and youngsters. The participants received treatment for the condition at the Headache Center. During the study, the scientists have found that many of the patients had mild deficiencies in vitamin D, riboflavin, and coenzyme Q10.

The authors of the research said: “Girls and young women were more likely than boys and young men to have coenzyme Q10 deficiencies. Boys and young men were more likely to have vitamin D deficiencies.”

The results of the study also show that deficiencies of coenzyme Q10 and riboflavin were found more in people with chronic migraines compared to those with episodic migraine sufferers.

More details here.