Strict Eating Schedule May Help Control Blood Sugar Level

A small study, recently conducted by an international team of researchers from the University of Adelaide, in Australia, and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, USA, finds that men who are at risk of type 2 diabetes can keep their blood sugar level under control by strictly sticking to the eating schedule.eating on schedule helps control blood sugar level

For the study, the researchers included 15 men aged 30–70 with a waist circumference of at least 102 cm and at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The analysis of the received data showed that time-restricted model of nutrition improved the glucose control of the participants.

Associate professor Leonie Heilbronn, a research leader at the university’s department of medicine comments: “Our results suggest that modulating when, rather than what, we eat can improve glucose control. [We] did see a tiny amount of weight loss in this study, which may have contributed to the results.”

Moderate Muscle Strength Can Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A recent study, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, finds that people with moderate muscle strength, achieved with the help of resistance exercise, can have a considerably lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.moderate muscle strength lowers the risk of diabetes

During the study, the researchers examined data of 4,681 adults whose age was between 20 and 100 years and none of them had diabetes at the beginning of the study called the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. Having analyzed the received data, the researchers concluded that people who had moderate muscle mass had a 32% lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

Study co-author Angelique Brellenthin comments: “We want to encourage small amounts of resistance training and it doesn’t need to be complicated. You can get a good resistance workout with squats, planks, or lunges. Then, as you build strength, you can consider adding free weights or weight machines.”

Three Cups of Coffee a Day May Cut the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes by 25%

A large-scale scientific review, presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes meeting in Berlin, suggests that three to four cups of coffee a day may decrease the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 25 percent.coffee cuts the risk of diabetes

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from 30 studies which involved about 1.2 million people and found the link between coffee and lower risk of diabetes in both in men and women but the effect was a bit greater in women.

The scientists believe that this effect is caused by the combination of compounds found in coffee such as trigonelline, cafestol, cafeic acid and chlorogenic acid. Though the researchers are unsure how these compounds work, they may have an anti-oxidant or anti-inflammatory effect on the body.

Intermittent Fasting May Increase the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A new study from Brazil suggests that trendy intermittent fasting may be the reason for increasing insulin levels and the amount of abdominal fat. It also may lead to the damage of pancreatic cells.intermittent fasting may increase the risk of diabetes

Intermittent fasting diet is a diet when a dieting person has “fast” days with a drastic restriction on calorie intake and “feast” days when one is allowed to eat anything.

For the study, a team of researchers placed healthy, adult rats on the diet for 3 months. During this period, scientists measured and monitored their insulin levels, function, body weight, and free radical levels.

At the end of the research, the rodents had lost weight according to expectations, but the distribution of their body fat changed unexpectedly — the amount of abdominal fat increased which is deeply associated with type 2 diabetes.

Whole Grains Could Be Fundamental in Blood Sugar Control

A new research by Rutgers University suggests that fiber may play a far more important role in nurturing the gut bacteria that control blood sugar and fat.blood sugar control

The researchers believe that this discovery could pave a new way to personalized high-fiber diets as the first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. It also could help to curb rated of diabetes diagnosis. Foods containing lots of fiber boost gut bacteria that control blood sugar by breaking down carbohydrates.

Professor Liping Zhao, one of the researchers and a microbiologist at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in New Jersey, says: “Our study lays the foundation and opens the possibility that fibers targeting this group of gut bacteria could eventually become a major part of your diet and your treatment.”

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