Intermittent Fasting May Increase the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A new study from Brazil suggests that trendy intermittent fasting may be the reason for increasing insulin levels and the amount of abdominal fat. It also may lead to the damage of pancreatic cells.intermittent fasting may increase the risk of diabetes

Intermittent fasting diet is a diet when a dieting person has “fast” days with a drastic restriction on calorie intake and “feast” days when one is allowed to eat anything.

For the study, a team of researchers placed healthy, adult rats on the diet for 3 months. During this period, scientists measured and monitored their insulin levels, function, body weight, and free radical levels.

At the end of the research, the rodents had lost weight according to expectations, but the distribution of their body fat changed unexpectedly — the amount of abdominal fat increased which is deeply associated with type 2 diabetes.

Whole Grains Could Be Fundamental in Blood Sugar Control

A new research by Rutgers University suggests that fiber may play a far more important role in nurturing the gut bacteria that control blood sugar and fat.blood sugar control

The researchers believe that this discovery could pave a new way to personalized high-fiber diets as the first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. It also could help to curb rated of diabetes diagnosis. Foods containing lots of fiber boost gut bacteria that control blood sugar by breaking down carbohydrates.

Professor Liping Zhao, one of the researchers and a microbiologist at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in New Jersey, says: “Our study lays the foundation and opens the possibility that fibers targeting this group of gut bacteria could eventually become a major part of your diet and your treatment.”

Diet Rich in Omega-6 May Reduce the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes by 35%

A new study review concludes that high consumption of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by 35 percent.omega-6

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed data from almost 40,000 adults across 20 studies. They found that people who had higher blood levels of linoleic acid, a main form of omega-6, were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes compared to those with lower levels of this fatty acid.

The study authors write: “The potential effects of omega-6 PUFAs, including linoleic acid and its metabolite arachidonic acid, on type 2 diabetes remain unresolved and are of considerable clinical, scientific, and public health importance.”

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Excessive Salt in Your Ration May Increase the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A new study from Sweden suggests that too much salt, or sodium chloride, in diet could increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.salt

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed data from 355 people diagnosed with LADA and 1,136 adults with type 2 diabetes from the Epidemiological Study of Risk Factors for LADA and Type 2 Diabetes (large Swedish cohort study).

The researchers discovered that every extra gram of sodium, or 2,5 grams of salt, a day was connected to a 43% higher risk of type 2 diabetes. For LADA, every gram of sodium was associated with a 73% increase in developing the condition.

Lack of Sleep in Childhood May Raise the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Later

A new study, executed by the scientists from St. George’s, University of London, UK suggests that there is a link between sleep duration and risk of developing type  2 diabetes in children.childhood sleep

Professor Owen and his team examined 4,525 children of age 9 and 10 years living in the United Kingdom. On average, children slept for 10.5 hours. The analysis of the collected data showed that just one hour of less sleep significantly raised such risk factors of diabetes type 2 as blood sugar and insulin resistance.

Professor Cristopher G. Owen says: “These findings suggest that increasing sleep duration could offer a simple approach to reducing levels of body fat and type 2 diabetes risk from early life […]. Potential benefits associated with increased sleep in childhood may have implications for health in adulthood.”