Lack of Vitamin D in Diabetics May Triple Risk of Early Death

A recent Austrian study suggests that lack of vitamin D in people diagnosed with diabetes may triple the risk of early death.Lack of Vitamin D in Diabetics May Triple Risk of Early Death

For their study, the researchers analyzed records of 78,581 diabetics of all ages that have been treated at the General Hospital of Vienna in Austria from 1991 to 2011. After that, these data were matched with the Austrian national register of deaths 20 years later.

The analysis showed that patient that were considered deficient (vitamin D levels less than 50 nmol/L) were associated with a double or triple increase of risk of early death from any cause.

The researchers said: “Our survival data… confirm a strong association of vitamin D deficiency (under 50 nmol/L) with increased mortality. This association is most pronounced in the younger and middle-aged groups and for causes of deaths other than cancer and cardiovascular disease, especially diabetes.”

Vitamin D Can Prevent Inflammatory Diseases Such as Rheumatoid Arthritis

A new study from the United Kingdom, published in the Journal of Autoimmunity, finds that vitamin D may prevent inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. This vitamin strengthens the immune system helping prevent the body from attacking healthy cells and causing autoimmune conditions of this kind.rheumatoid arthritis

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed blood samples and joint fluid samples from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Study author Dr. Louisa Jeffery from the University of Birmingham says: “Our research indicated that maintaining sufficient vitamin D may help to prevent the onset of an inflammatory disease like rheumatoid arthritis.”

10 Categories of People that Are at Higher Risk of Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency is now a global public-health problem affecting an estimated 1 billion people. Vitamin D deficiencies are connected to the increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and heart disease. Moreover, people with a diagnosis of prostate or breast cancer have lower chances to survive than those with normal levels of vitamin D.vitamin d deficiency

Here are 10 categories of people that are in risk group:

  1. Adults older than 55.
  2. Office workers.
  3. People with darker skin.
  4. Inflammatory bowel disease patients.
  5. Vegans and vegetarians.
  6. People with a high body fat percentage.
  7. People taking medications such as corticosteroids, weight-loss drugs, and the cholesterol-lowering drug cholestyramine.
  8. People with constant joint and muscles aches.
  9. People suffering from depression.
  10. People suffering from chronic headaches.

Improper Use of Sunscreen Associated with Vitamin D Deficiency

A clinical review, published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, finds that about 1 billion people around the globe may experience vitamin D deficiency or be insufficient of vitamin D levels because of chronic disease and improper sun exposure connected to sunscreen use.Vitamin D Deficiency

Moreover, the study found that 95% of African American adults may be vitamin D deficient or have insufficient levels of the vitamin.

A researcher on this study Kim Pfotenhauer, DO, assistant professor at Touro University, explains: “People are spending less time outside and, when they do go out, they’re typically wearing sunscreen, which essentially nullifies the body’s ability to produce vitamin D. While we want people to protect themselves against skin cancer, there are healthy, moderate levels of unprotected sun exposure that can be very helpful in boosting vitamin D.”

Dairy with Vitamin D May Protect Senior People against Bone Loss

A new research, executed by the scientists from the Harvard-affiliated Hebrew Senior Life and the University of Massachusetts, shows that a combination of vitamin D supplements and certain dairies can protect seniors from age-related bone loss.diary against bone loss

The study included participants who have been enrolled in the long-term Framingham Study, which began in 1948. The study followed the health and habits of residents of the town of Framingham, Massachusetts, USA.

The lead author Shivani Sahni of the study says that it is significant because it looked at dairy products other than just milk, and it also clarified that the association of dairy foods with bone density is dependent on adequate vitamin D intake.