Scientists Determined How Much Time We Need to Spend in Nature

A new study, from the University of Exeter Medical School, UK, and Uppsala University, Sweden, finds that 2 hours of being in nature — parks, forests, and beaches — is enough to boost the overall well-being.Scientists Determined How Much Time We Need to Spend in Nature

To check their hypothesis, the team of researchers took data from the Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment survey which were collected by conducting face-to-face interviews with 20,264 people.

Among the questions about the overall health, there were such questions as how much contact they had had with nature in the past 7 days, including “parks, canals, and nature areas; the coast and beaches; and the countryside including farmland, woodland, hills, and rivers.”

Study lead Dr. Mathew P. White comments: “Two hours a week is hopefully a realistic target for many people, especially given that it can be spread over an entire week to get the benefit.”

7 Tips to Make Your Morning Workouts Much Easier

Ever wondered how those crazy people can exercise in the early morning? Well, you can become one of them. Anna Magee, a health writer and editor of Healthista, shares her tips on how to make your early morning workouts easier:your morning workouts

  1. Tell yourself that your workout will take only 10 minutes.
  2. Ask yourself what kind of day you’re going to have.
  3. Find out the best moves for you and do them.
  4. Find out what are scientifically proven effects of exercise.
  5. Set realistic and incremental goals.
  6. Know your reasons and your excuses.
  7. Find your motivation.

Going to a Concert Is Better for Your Health than Yoga

Researchers from the University of London discovered that people who listened to live music for 20 minutes had 21% boost in their mood while those who took yoga class had only 10%.concert

For their study, scientists performed psychometric tests on 60 people who either went to a Paloma Faith music concert, a yoga class or walked their dog. After completing the 40 question quiz, the participants were formed into three groups to monitor their heart rates.

Patrick Fagan, an expert in behavioral science and associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s University in London, says: “Our research showcases the profound impact gigs have on feelings of health, happiness, and wellbeing – with fortnightly or regular attendance being the key.”

Self-deprecating Jokes Show You Are Happy and Well Socially Adjusted

A new study from the University of Granada, Spain, shows that contrary to the widespread belief, those who make self-deprecating jokes do not have low self-esteem, nor they are predisposed to depression. In fact, scientists suggest that this type of people may be happier and better socially adjusted than others.self-deprecating joke

Having analyzed the material received in the study, the scientists concluded that self-defeating humor was associated with greater anger suppression. On the contrary, those people who use self-enhancing humor also tend to manage their anger better or simply feel less angry.

Study co-author Ginés Navarro-Carrillo says: “The results suggest that humor, even when presented as benign or well-intentioned, can also represent a strategy for masking negative intentions.  [Humor] enables individuals with low scores in honesty to build trust, closeness, etc. with other people, and thereby use important information in order to manipulate them or obtain advantages in the future.”

Keeping Secrets May Affect Your Well-Being and Productivity

A new study, executed by the scientists from Columbia University, discovered that keeping secrets may lead to a lower level of well-being, as well as affect your productivity.keeping secrets

For the research, a team of researchers has analyzed the data including 13,000 secrets from 10 previous studies. The topics of the secrets were such as romantic desire, finances, and sexual behavior.

Malia Mason, one of the authors of the study and an associate professor of management at Columbia Business School, says: “Secrets exert a gravitational pull on our attention. It’s the cyclical revisiting of our mistakes that explains the harmful effects that secrets can have on our well-being.”

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