Fiber in Diet May Improve Survival in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

A new study, published in JAMA Oncology, finds that higher fiber intake may help improve survival for patients in the early stages of colorectal cancer.improve survival

For the study, a team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, US, included the data of 1,575 individuals who were part of the Nurses’ Health Study or the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Having analyzed the data, they found that every 5-gram increase in fiber per day was linked to a 22% reduction in colorectal cancer-specific mortality and a 14% reduction in all-cause mortality.

The scientists concluded in their study: “Higher intake of fiber and whole grains after a colorectal cancer diagnosis is associated with a lower rate of death from that disease and other causes. Our findings provide support for the nutritional recommendations of maintaining sufficient fiber intake among CRC survivors.”

Top 6 Whole Grains Worth Adding to Your Meal Plan

For the last couple of years, we’ve all come a long way in knowing more whole grains, not only brown rice. Nowadays there are so many options that it is quite complicated to decide which one is the best for you. As Whole Grains Council explains, there is no healthiest whole grain. Some of the grains are stronger in one nutrient, another suggests different nutrients. Here are six whole grains that you can add to your nutrition plan:whole grains

  1. Brown rice.
  2. Quinoa.
  3. Barley.
  4. Sorghum.
  5. Bulgar.
  6. Whole-wheat pasta.

A Diet Rich in Whole Grains May Lead to Healthier Gut and Better Immunity

According to a recent study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, eating a diet that includes whole grains leads to healthier gut and stronger immune system. Whole grains include such products as whole wheat, oats, rye, barley, brown rice, and quinoa.whole grains lead to healthier gut

In the study, 81 healthy adults participated. All of them ate a Western-style diet high in refined grains during the first two weeks (the study lasted for 8 weeks). During the other 6 weeks, half of the participants continued a Western-style diet, and another half ate the same diet, but instead of refined grains, they consumed whole grains.

Having analyzed the results of the study, the scientists found that those who consumed the diet rich in whole grains showed an increase in a type of bacteria called Lachnospira, which is known to produce short-chain fatty acids. Moreover, those who consumed the whole-grain diet showed a reduction Enterobacteriaceae, bacteria that trigger inflammation.